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1603306 tn?1370614713

Post DCR surgery

I had my DCR surgery last summer. For the most part it is an improvement, Here recently when I get up in the morning I have a lot of crust in that eye. Once I wash my face, white puss-like liquid comes from the tear duct. It is not an ugly color, just white and milky. Is that normal?
4 Responses
1530171 tn?1448129593
Hi and welcome to the forum.

If this discharge continues, you should see your Ophthalmological Surgeon that performed the DCR surgery. You definitely cannot afford to get an infection there.
There's usually a one year post-operation care arrangement, for procedures like yours.
He might have to do a dacryocystogram ( it's another Greek term and I'm so thankful for my Greek roots!).
Hopefully you won't have to have a repeat DCR.

Blessings
Nikodicreta

1355118 tn?1298564879
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Hi, welcome to the forum, there seems to be mucopurulent drainage from the puncta occurs when there is bacterial growth in the stagnant tear pool of the lacrimal sac called as acute dacryocystitis.  It also present with erythema, swelling, warmth, and/or tenderness of the lacrimal sac. There seems to be secondary complication of the surgery.

This needs to be treated with topical antibiotics. Mostly caused by Streptococcus pneumonia, Haemophilus influenzae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus viridans .

Sometimes oral antibiotics may be needed to prevent further complications. I suggest you to consult Ophthalmologist for appropriate prescription and management. Take care and regards.
1355118 tn?1298564879
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Hi, welcome to the forum, there seems to be mucopurulent drainage from the puncta occurs when there is bacterial growth in the stagnant tear pool of the lacrimal sac called as acute dacryocystitis.  It also present with erythema, swelling, warmth, and/or tenderness of the lacrimal sac. There seems to be secondary complication of the surgery.

This needs to be treated with topical antibiotics. Mostly caused by Streptococcus pneumonia, Haemophilus influenzae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus viridans .

Sometimes oral antibiotics may be needed to prevent further complications. I suggest you to consult Ophthalmologist for appropriate prescription and management. Take care and regards.
1603306 tn?1370614713
Thank you so much for the quick response. I will contact my Ophthamologist really soon to get it checked out. It is not causing me to be in any pain. I was just concerned because of the color and knowing that my eye was not doing that before the surgery. Thank you so much.
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