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my child is 13 years old.he is suffering from allergy from 3years.he sneezes daily in fixed
time.after that his nose is injured and fill with
wounds.sometimes blood comes out from nose and strokes in body.his allergens are
milk product,onion,tomato,dust mites and
house dust.please prescribe some drugs and advice.
1 Responses
3133475 tn?1342676015
Total avoidance of cow's milk and all dairy products
No pork, ham or bacon
No eggs or egg products
No food or drink which contains sugar
No nuts of any kind
Most important is to avoid pork and dairy products. Cow's milk can be replaced by soy milk or goat or sheep milk, since these milks contains totally different proteins

Foods That Fight Allergies

While some foods may aggravate allergies, other foods can help fight allergies. According to Prevention, a nutritious diet can help control underlying inflammation, dilate air passages, and thin mucus in the lungs.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Omega-3 essential fatty acids contain eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), which is a natural anti-inflammatory. Good sources of Omega-3 fatty acids include flaxseed oil, salmon, haddock, cod, and other cold-water fish. Another essential acid, gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), also acts as an anti-inflammatory, and it can be found in evening primrose oil, borage oil, and black currant seed oil. If possible, include more of both of these fatty acids in your diet.

On the flip side, too much Omega-6 fatty acid may intensify inflammation. Most people in our society need more Omega-3 fatty acids and less Omega-6 fatty acids. Foods high in Omega-6 fatty acids include cottonseed, corn, and sunflower oils, as well as processed foods like mayonnaise, salad dressing, and fast food. Saturated fats and trans fats also trigger the release of inflammatory chemicals. Avoid anything that contains partially hydrogenated oil. Try to use monosaturated olive oil as your primary source of fat.


Fruit Juices

Fruit juices are rich sources of antioxidants that help reduce inflammation, but read the label to make sure that it's real juice and not a bottle of corn syrup. Eat more fresh fruits and vegetables to get more antioxidants in your diet. Berries have especially high levels of antioxidants.



High-Fiber Foods

A high-fiber diet makes for a healthy colon. A low-fiber diet produces a lazy colon that's more susceptible to disease. High-fiber foods like whole grains, nuts, and seeds stimulate movement in the colon and encourage the growth of "good" bacteria. In an unhealthy colon, "bad" bacteria and fungal organisms like candida may take over, which could lead to leaky gut syndrome. Leaky gut syndrome often leads to food allergies and chemical sensitivities.



Yogurt & Kefir

Another way to increase the number of good bacteria in your gut is to eat them directly. Yogurt and kefir contain live bacterial cultures. In one University of California study, allergic symptoms declined by 90 percent when patients were fed 18 to 24 ounces of yogurt a day. If you're trying to avoid dairy products, opt for a probiotic supplement.


Spices

Turmeric and ginger are known anti-inflammatory agents.

Magnesium

Some studies have shown that people who have asthma are deficient in magnesium. Foods rich in magnesium include spinash, navy and pinto beans, sunflower seeds, tofu, halibut, artichokes, and black-eyed peas.

Zinc

Other studies have shown that people with asthma are deficient in zinc. Foods rich in zinc include yogurt, tofu, lean beef and ham, oysters, crab, and the dark meat of turkey and chicken.

Butterbur

The herb butterbur (Petasites hybridus) is a shrub-like plant that grows in northern Asia, Europe, and parts of North America. Extracts made from the herb have been used in folk medicine for migraines, stomach cramps, coughs, allergies and asthma.
Butterbur is being studied as a natural allergy remedy. Although how butterbur works is still not known, it is thought to work in a similar way to allergy medications by blocking the action of histamine and leukotrienes, inflammatory chemicals involved in allergic reactions.

In a study involving 186 people with hay fever, participants took a higher dose of butterbur (one tablet three times a day), a lower dose (one tablet two times a day) or a placebo. After two weeks, both the higher and lower dose relieved allergy symptoms compared to the placebo, but there were significantly greater benefits seen with the higher dose.

In another study, 330 people with hay fever were given a butterbur extract (one tablet three times a day), the antihistamine drug fexofenadine (Allegra), or a placebo. Butterbur was as effective as fexofenadine at relieving sneezing, nasal congestion, itchy eyes, and other hay fever symptoms, and both treatments were more effective than the placebo.

Side effects of butterbur may include indigestion, headache, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, diarrha, or constipation. Pregnant or nursing women, children, or people with kidney or liver disease should not take butterbur.

Butterbur is in the ragweed plant family, so people who are allergic to ragweed, marigold, daisy, or chrysanthemum should avoid butterbur.

The raw herb as well as teas, extracts, and capsules made from the raw herb should not be used because they contain substances called pyrrolizidine alkaloids that can be toxic to the liver and kidneys and may cause cancer.

It is possible to remove the pyrrolizidine alkaloids from butterbur products. For example, in Germany, there is a safety limit to the level of pyrrolizidine alkaloids allowed in butterbur products. The daily recommended dose cannot exceed 1 microgram per day.

2) Quercetin

Quercetin is a type of antioxidant called a flavonoid. Although there is still isn't enough research to conclude that quercetin is an effective allergy remedy, it is thought to prevent the release of the inflammatory chemical histamine, which is involved in allergy symptoms such as sneezing and itching.

Quercetin is found naturally in certain foods, such as apples (with the skin on), berries, red grapes, red onions, capers, and black tea. It is also available in supplement form. A typical dose for allergies and hay fever is between 200 and 400 milligrams three times a day. To find out more about quercetin, read the quercetin fact sheet.

3) Carotenoids

Carotenoids are a family of plant pigments, the most popular being beta-carotene. Although no randomized controlled trials show that carotenoids are effective remedies for allergies, a lack of carotenoids in the diet is thought to promote inflammation in your airways.

There are no guidelines or research that suggests a certain target intake for hay fever. Many people don't even get one serving of carotenoid-rich foods a day. If this is you, consider striving for one to two servings a day to up your intake.

Good sources of carotenoids include apricots, carrots, pumpkin, sweet potato, spinach, kale, butternut squash, and collard greens.
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