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Avatar universal

Blood clots in Urine; Frequent Urination; Chocolate?

Our 12.5 yo small female pointer (basically still very active & healthy--don't let the age throw you!) never has accidents in the house until today when I noticed she also has blood clots in her urine. She has been going frequently and usually gets some urine out, but then tries to go 2 or 3 more times with just drops/dribbles. I have noticed several blood clots. She normally would ring a bell to tell us she has to go out, but she doesn't ring the bell. The urine also smells a little bit fishy. I am hoping this is just a UTI (that can be cleared-up with antibiotics), but was also wondering if it could have anything to do with the fact that she got into a bunch of candy in our car Thursday while we were in a restaurant (including Sugar Babies, Peanut M&M's,& the one I worried about most-- After 8 mints (dark chocolate). She never did have diarrhea or throw-up. The only other difference is that we have been feeding her and our other dog a different food-- Nutro Dental Health. But they have been eating that for several weeks now. Normally they are on Purina One or the Vet supplied Purina Dental Health formula.

I guess my questions are: 1. Could this have been caused by her eating chocolate/candy? 2. Could this be indicative of more serious problems like cancer or something else? If it is kidney or bladder stones, how serious are those?  Is there anything I can do until I can get her into the vet? I have a call into the vet to try to get her in the first thing in the morning. Any insight/help is appreciated. Thanks!
3 Responses
234713 tn?1283530259
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Unless she is less than 45 pounds she should not have had a problem with the chocolate.   However, if you have miscalculated the amount of chocolate and she had a bit more than you think she could have some residual theobromine toxicity (chocolate toxin).   Urinary tract infections can cause hematuria (blood in the urine).  Other causes of blood in the urine are urolithiasis (bladder stones), kidney stones, bladder cancer, or kidney disease, bleeding disorders and others.  It is best to take her the vet first thing tomorrow for a urinalysis, X-Ray of the abdomen, and complete blood work.  

If she has bladder stones thay would have to be surgically removed. Bladder cancer is sometimes visible on abdominal X-Ray, or ultrasound, and is of course serious.  
234713 tn?1283530259
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Unless she is less than 45 pounds she should not have had a problem with the chocolate.   However, if you have miscalculated the amount of chocolate and she had a bit more than you think she could have some residual theobromine toxicity (chocolate toxin).   Urinary tract infections can cause hematuria (blood in the urine).  Other causes of blood in the urine are urolithiasis (bladder stones), kidney stones, bladder cancer, or kidney disease, bleeding disorders and others.  It is best to take her the vet first thing tomorrow for a urinalysis, X-Ray of the abdomen, and complete blood work.  

If she has bladder stones thay would have to be surgically removed. Bladder cancer is sometimes visible on abdominal X-Ray, or ultrasound, and is of course serious.  
Avatar universal
Thanks for responding. She does weigh right around 40-42 pounds. Our vet does have their own ultrasound machine, so that is an easy option without going elsewhere. Hoping for a plain old UTI! Thanks again.
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