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Avatar universal

Please help with 13 y/o lab

I am new to this forum. We took my dog to the vet on Tuesday due to having bloody noses. They did an exam and found out she has an abscess tooth. They belive that is why she was having the bloody noses. She has been eating and drinking normal. They said the tooth must come out. But the infection has to clear before they can remove it. The vet put her on an antibiotic. She couldn't barely walk the next day. We called the vet that morning. She is having trouble seeing, she is walking into walls, not eating, seems kind of delusional. The vet said to take her off the medication and we took her back to the vet. They do not know what is causing this. They did put her on a new antibiotic yesterday. She was able to eat a little bit of chicken. But again this morning she would not eat. Is there any help anyone could give me? I hate seeing her this way. Is this normal when a dog is on antibiotics? Please help.

Thank you,
Noelle
4 Responses
234713 tn?1283530259
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Sorry about the delay in writing.  I have had software problems since the latest update by medhelp.

Two common antibiotics, metronidazole and baytril can have neurological side effects, but all drugs of any kind have some side effects.  Additionally, many antibiotics cause a die-off of the good bacteria in the stomach and intestines which can cause inappetance, and vomiting and diarrhea.  I will often include a probiotic to any protocol in which I must use an antibiotic.  Probiotic's include acidophilus and all the good bacteria like those found in Activia yogurt.

Your dog may be particularily sensitive to antibiotic's and it may take several antibiotic trials before finding one that your dog does not have a problem with.  

A tooth abscess/infection that can cause nose bleeds may be severe enough to extend into the dog's sinus cavities and could be enough to cause inappetance with out any help from the antibiotic.
Avatar universal
When my dog had pneumonia the first antibiotic he was on made him completely annorexic. I perservered for 5 days because I thought he needed it to get rid of the bronchitis, then I took him back because he basically ate nothing for 4 days and was walking around the house looking disoriented. Walking into furniture and panting, he wouldn't lie down.
His tongue was blue. I took him to the emerg and they changed the antibiotics, and he spent 5 days in hospital on IV and oxygen. The finally found the bacteria that he had after a lung wash. He tolerated the new antibiotic well for 6 weeks then he developed diahrreah and had to go on an additional antibiotic for his bowel. Now he is fine. Eating well. He lost 6 lbs that first week, so if in a few days your dog doesn't improve, I would take her back for a reassesment.
Hope she gets well soon.
Avatar universal
Thank you for your response. We spoke with the vet this evening. We will be taking her in tomorrow morning. They are going to put her on an IV to get fluids in her. My dog is doing the same thing. She is walking around in circles, looks VERY disoriented, walking into furniture, and is panting. I just don't understand why this is happening to her.

How long did it take your dog to bounce back and how old is he? What kind of dog is it?
Avatar universal
He was in hospital for 6 days or so. He got better almost immediately on oxygen, and it took that long to wean him off and get the right antibiotic.   He's almost 12 and a siberian husky. Aside from his allergies, this is the first time he's been ill.
Hope things improve,
Linda
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