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4430758 tn?1354486028
Pharyngitis wont go away, any help?
I've been having it for a week and a few days now. It is painless. But my tonsils are swollen, with specks of puss on it. I went to the ER the day before thanksgiving and the doctor ran a test and said that I have Acute Pharyngitis. Is that a bad thing? Anyway, he gave me some steroids to take for three days. It stopped it from getting worse but it didn't help it go away. The whole time it was completely painless, but it was annoying.  I think it has something to do with my allergies. But I also gave a guy oral sex. He said he had his check up and stuff and didn't have HIV or any STDS. I've been paranoid about having HIV or an STD.
2 Responses
242587 tn?1355427710
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
The usual cause of swollen tonsils with “specks of pus” is bacterial infection, the most common being a Strep Throat.  However, oral sex can result in throat infection with gonorrhea.  The bottom line is that you should have a reexamination and a complete throat culture, complete in the sense that it is not a culture designed to reveal the presence or absence of Strep.


Good luck
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A related discussion, Bumps in the back of my throat was started.
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