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Avatar universal

What does it mean when a doctor tells you your chest is tight?

I had asthma as a child in elementry, but when we moved cross country it stopped bugging me. 10 years later my family and I have moved back across the country to where I did elementry. Now that we are back my asthma has also returned. The climate is much dryer here then where I spent the last 10 years.

Today I saw specialist about my asthma and he told me my chest is tight and gave me Symbicort Turbuhaler. I looked all the information I could on the inhailer, but I am still unsure what he means by my chest is tight.

When my asthma bothered me as a child I was too off in my own world to understand what it meant. I just knew my mum told me I had to use this puffer. So my self knoweledge on asthma is not that great.

Thank you in advance for your responce.
3 Responses
746512 tn?1388807580
"Tight" tends to be more of symptom an asthmatic feels - normally due to the inflammation in the lungs making it a bit harder to breathe.  The doctor probably heard very mild wheezing and that is why he said "tight".

I hope he also gave you a ventolin inhaler to use when you are symptomatic, you will need this if your asthma is indeed back.  You should start to breath easier with the symbicort, if nothing changes I would ask for a methacholine challenge to prove that is indeed asthma that is back.
Avatar universal
The inhaler he gave is helping thankfully. But I am only suppose to use it for a week so what I am suppose to do after that I am unsure, hoping to be able to ask him. He did not give me another inhaler. I did do some form of breathing test at the beginning of the appointment though.
746512 tn?1388807580
If you are still having problems after the week go back to the doctor and ask for advice.  This is what they did to me too, possible asthma so I got advair inhaler to try .... Problem was I didn't get the ventolin rescue and needed it during a test, got very light headed and couldn't breathe.  

So keep a close eye.

You might even want to go back in after that week and get the doctor to double check your lungs sound better before you stop the inhaler.  
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