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Do I have Anemia ?

Hello guys,

I had a blood test several months ago, below are the results:
Hemoglobin: 12.1  , normal range: 14.0 - 18.0
Hematocrit : 37  , normal range: 40-54%
Leukocyte: 9900 , normal range:4000-10000

According to these, Do I have anemia ?

The symtomps that I have been dealing with for the last 6 years are: fatigue, dizziness, sleepiness, back ache/pain never goes away, ache all over body, belching , dry lips. I have visited neurology doctors, got MRI shows normal, physiotherapy for my back but still the pain never gone. I also have visited internist, sonogram for gallbladder normal, he also tells that I have high level of acid in my stomach.

Please help me.
Thank you.
1 Responses
351246 tn?1379685732
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Hi!
Yes, though nothing very severe, you do have anemia. To treat this, you need to find the cause. Low hematocrit is due to anemia, malnutrition, destruction of red cells by spleen, bone marrow failure, and blood loss as in stomach ulcers and irritable bowel disease or in kidney stones. Low hemoglobin is seen in low iron, kidney diseases, cancers (leukemias, Hodgkin's lymphoma's, myeloma, and other blood cancers), aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes (bone marrow disorders), cirrhosis of liver, lead poisoning, and in vitamin deficiency. Low hemoglobin can also be due to increased destruction of blood or its components as seen in spleen disorders, sickle cell anemia, thalssemia etc. It can also be due to increased blood loss as seen in bleeding in your gastrointestinal tract, either due to esophageal varices, polyps, gastric bypass site, hemorrhoids or an ulcer. Please consult a doctor to find the cause. Take care!

The medical advice given should not be considered a substitute for medical care provided by a doctor who can examine you. The advice may not be completely correct for you as the doctor cannot examine you and does not know your complete medical history. Hence this reply to your post should only be considered as a guiding line and you must consult your doctor at the earliest for your medical problem.
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