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Question about Father's Highly Elevated Eosinophils

Hello,

Thank you reading my message!

My father is 82 years old, lives alone in India. He is physically active(walking and exercise bike every day) and socially active.

He had cough and cold infection that began in Dec 2018 and took about 2.5 months to resolve. During that period, he saw his Pulmonalogist who prescribed several antibiotics, antihistamines and anti-allergy medications.

Every six months, his PCP does several tests (CBC, Urine, Liver Function tests, Metabolic tests etc):

1) His CBC had a high value of Eosinophils of 18.1 %. His WBC is 6100 /cu.mm . Therefore, his absolute Eosinophils count is 1101, which is way more than the normal value of less than 500.

2) He had borderline values for Hemoglobin, MCH, MCV, RBC and RDW. He has been seeing a Hematologist for elevated MCV twice a year since two years. He was asked to take Vitamin B12 injections. The Hematologist has been satisfied with how many father is doing and stopped the Vitamin B12 injections during his last appointment in January 2019.

3) His other values on CBC were normal.

Father is otherwise is fine without any symptoms. He is 5 ft 3 inches in height, 123 lbs in weight, but his waist size is 36.5 inches. He eats a vegetarian diet of brown rice, nuts, fruits, vegetables:

Question:

1) Does a 18.1% of Eosinophils with an absolute count of 1100 indicate signs of a serious disorder?

2) Can the cough/cold and all the medications he took for the last 2.5 months explain the high Eosinophils?

Thank you!!
Zent
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