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Avatar universal

Lump on rib

Hi, I'm a 20 year old male and about 3-4 weeks ago i had a chest cold, nothing unusual, cough did not persist for more than about a week and a half to two weeks, but towards the end of my illness i developed a rather sharp pain on the upper right side of my chest. After a bit of poking and prodding i localized the source of the pain to just right of center of my chest right below my collar bone. Normally i would not give this a second thought, writing it off as a strained muscle from the coughing, but i also noticed that there is a rather pronounced bump about where my rib meets my sternum. As i said, this was about 3 or 4 weeks ago, and since then it has quit hurting, although is still sore if i apply pressure to the bump. I also feel a dull ache when i take deep breathes or cough. For a while i forgot about it but recently my mind keeps wondering back to it and im getting more and more concerned.
So my question is thus, are there any possible causes of this protrusion aside from bone cancer (considering my recent bout of coughing)? I'm pretty worried considering i had a chest x-ray done a few months ago which showed a slight anomaly on my spine, which the doctor said could have been an artifact of the x-ray, a healed fracture or possibly bone cancer. He wasn't worried and did not think it was cancerous so i refused further testing (i really hate medical tests, specifically blood tests). But now I've noticed this bump and my suspicions are peaked.
I am really trying to avoid a trip to the doctor at this point (i have a bit of a phobia of hospitals), but if it changes or the pain (how ever dull) does not subside in a months time then i will have no choice.

Thank you for your time,

-Danny
1 Responses
Avatar universal
So - did you go to the doctor to find out what it is?
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