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Possible pituitary issue?

Hi.  I am a 24-year old women and my test results are as follows:
T3 total: 69 ng/dL (85-185) *T3 level was checked twice a month apart, and both times, it was very low
T4 total: 7.4 (4.9-11.4)
TSH 1.16 mcIU/mL (0.3-4.7)

DHEAS: 4650 ng/mL (400-3600)
Testosterone, total 55 ng/dL (2-45)
Testosterone, free 2.5 pg/mL (0.1-6.4)

I've been underweight all my life (runs in the family) and I'm trying to gain weight to see if that will raise the T3 level.  Meanwhile, I was wondering if there would be any merit in checking my cortisol level - especially since my DHEAS is also high.  Could there possibly be a pituitary involvement?

Thank you.
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Avatar universal
COMMUNITY LEADER
The only pituitary test you had was TSH and it was normal (a bit high for some people to feel well but shows function). My doc likes a higher FT4 as well. I hope your doc is going to put you on meds.

DHEAS follows with LH and FSH as it works with the androgens. Even though it is an adrenal hormone, it converts to estrogen and testosterone. All those should be tested. It follows that your testosterone is high - but what about your estradiol and the rest? Only half was tested.

As for cortisol and ACTH, if you are having symptoms of low cortisol like nausea, tanning, fatigue, etc. then I would ask.

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Avatar universal
Hi did you get any answers regarding you're high dheas  currently in same position x
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Avatar universal
COMMUNITY LEADER
I take it OTC per doc orders as my adrenals were removed.
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