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Avatar universal

DCIS - really that dangerous?

Routine mammogram led to "suspicious" cysts; diagnosed intermediate DCIS after needle biopsy. I'm 46, my physician says "you've probably had this for 5 years". My question, if this has been there for 5 years, what's the rush for mastectomy? I'm thinking check it every 6 months and treat when/if it begins to change.
Also concerned about recurring pain and bruising at biopsy site - can a biopsy actually make things worse by stirring around in there?
25 Responses
Avatar universal
Dear canilaughyet, DCIS is an early ductal cancer in which the abnormal cells are confined to the duct, and do not yet have the ability to spread.  The difference between DCIS and early invasive cancer (that is capable of spreading) may not be detected through mammography.  It is impossible to predict when DCIS will become invasive.  Therefore the standard of care for DCIS is to remove the lump or the breast (depending on the evaluation and recommendation from the surgeon) and follow-up with appropriate treatments depending on the final pathology.

It is not uncommon to experience bruising and discomfort at the biopsy site.  A biopsy does not impact cancer growth.
Avatar universal
If it were me, I'd have it OUT ASAP.  Why wait for in situ to God forbid become invasive.  DCIS has the highest cure rates.  I would question why the surgeon has recommended a mastectomy rather than lumpectomy with radiation though.
127512 tn?1193745816
Waiting for my results today. Actually they just called but I would not answer the phone. I do not want to talk to them until husband gets home from work and we can both get the news at the same time. Crazy Hugh. Scared I guess. They have pretty much said it looks like DCIS and that I need a masectomy also. I do not know why they recommend masectomy more verses lumpetomy. Mine are both wide spread and clustered calcifications so I believe that is why they want to do masectomy. I believe I would rather get it out than to wait for it to become invasive. Let you know when I get my result today.
Avatar universal
I am slightly ahead of you in the same process.  I was diagnosed with DCIS, 4mm, Stage 0, July 17.  Tomorrow is my surgery and I had 2 opinions and neither even remotly suggested a mastectomy.  Get another opinion, a lumpectomy should be enough.  After tomorrow I can tell you what is really feels like to have the surgery.  Hang in there I am just as nervous and still scared as you are.  The biopsy only tells them a hint of the information they need to really understand what is there.  They need the lump to see its entire makeup.  Start making appointments and getting it done.  Good luck.
127512 tn?1193745816
Did you have a lump? Did you have calcifications? How did you find yours. I have small lump just behind the nipple and alot of calcifications 2 clusters and some spread out. Doctor that did my biopsy just called only to say I had DCIS maybe comedo but not for sure on the comedo. Shouldn't he have told me more? Told me to see my surgeon. I wish you all the best. I am sorry you have to go through this. Please keep us posted.
Avatar universal
I also had DCIS.  My calcifications were in three different areas of my breast.  Two were stage 1 and the other stage 0.  My surgeon recommended a mastectomy also.  I got a second opinion (from a younger surgeon) who said I had a choice.  I opted for the mastectomy after discussing with my first surgeon again.  It turns out that I think I made the correct decision as two nodes were positive and my FISH test came back positive.  Both things tell me that while it was a very early stage of cancer, it was agressive.  I've done the a/c chemo and now am starting Taxol and Herceptin.  
I wish you an easy time through everything.
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