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I am a 38 Yr old female, there is a lump in my left breast on upper outer quadrant

My Mammography and Sonography reports states that, Left breast: An oval high density mass with partially obscured margins is seen in the upper outer quadrant. No obvious suspicious calcifications are seen.
Focal asymmetry is seen in the upper outer quadrant, inferomedial to the mass.
On left breast USG, an oval hypoechoic mass with circumscribed margins and posterior acoustic
enhancement is seen extending at 2-3 o' clock positions. It measures about 3.1 x 1.7 x 2.5 cm. It shows no
significant internal vascularity and is intermediate on elastography. It is about 10 cm from the nipple.
No obvious correlate is seen for the asymmetry. No significant left axillary node is seen.
Bilateral mammogram and USG reveals
-Left breast mass as described, likely fibroepithelial lesion. ACR BIRADS Category 4a: Low suspicion of
malignancy. HPR correlation is suggested to rule out Phyllodes tumour.
-Left breast asymmetry as described. This could be parenchymal and can be followed up.
However, if the histopathology of the ipsilateral breast mass is malignant, then repeat mammogram with
tomosynthesis would be worthwhile.

Biopsy report is awaited.
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Avatar universal
I am so sorry you are going through this. I don’t have an answer for you, but I am 45 and am going through the same thing with nearly identical mammo and ultrasound results. My biopsy is next week. I am nervous but trying to take things in stride. Hope all went well for your
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