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Mammogram and ultrasound results-

I have some concern with my mammogram.  I am 42 years old and the past two years I have a cyst on my right breast.  I have been doing a follow up mammogram and ultrasound every 6 months.  Also, I have dense breast.
I am grateful the doctors are continually checking my right breast.  This time I received the results of the ultrasound.  Noted are a cluster of cysts and a complicated cyst in the right breast at 9 o'clock, 6 CMFN, together measuring 16 x 4 x 11 mm on my left breast.  Also, it states ACR BI-RADS Category 3 - Probably Benign.  What does this mean?  Should I get a second opinion?
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15695260 tn?1549593113
Hello and welcome to the forum. Please let us know what your doctor says when they follow up with you to go over results.  Bi Rad scores are assigned when there are abnormal findings on mammograms or ultrasounds.  The radiologist assigns a score to it to indicate level of concern. It ranges from 0 (definitely no cancer) to 6 (most certainly cancer). You are in the middle but they specifically say probably benign. However, they will follow up to make sure.  That's your next step.  Has your doctor been in touch with you to discuss this? At this point, I don't think a second opinion is necessary as it indicates they need further investigation.  After that, if you are not satisfied, second opinions to confirm are never a bad idea.  I'm very sorry you are going through this.  https://www.healthline.com/health/birads-score  Please let us know the follow up and your next steps.
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