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Need help in staging

My mom who is 57 years old recently went through a modified radical mastectomy for her right breast. Below are the details from the pathology report. Please help me understand the following from her reports.

1. Since her apical nodes are involved, does this mean that cancer has spread to other parts in her body?
2. Since they found comedo pattern, does this mean the cancer is very aggressive?
3. She is ER/PR negative and HER2/nu 2+. Awaiting FISH test results for further diagnosis?
4. What could be the stage of her cancer.
5. She is scheduled to have Chemo 3 weeks after surgery. Wouldn't the cancer spread within this time frame?

Pathology report after mastectomy
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Extensive DCIS and comedonecrosis with small foci of invasive ductal carcinoma
Lump approximated = 3.5x3x2cm
With invasive component approximately=1.0x0.4x0.5cm
Lymphovascular emboli discerned
Metastatic deposits in six of eighteen axillary lymph nodes 6/18
Perinodal lymphatic shows tumor emboli
Metastatic deposits in two of two apical lymph nodes 2/2
Resected margins are free of tumor


1 Responses
25201 tn?1255584436
First let me say that staging is not up to you .... this is something that requires not only detailed information but also the understanding of the information. There are many components to the Staging process. The node invasion in your Mom's case is just that ... scans would be needed to determine if the cancer has metastisized to other parts of the body. These may be done before her Chemo is started. As to the delay before Chemo; hopefully the primary cancer site was removed as indicated by clear margins. Best wishes for your Mom's uneventful recovery and successful treatment.    
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