Aa
Aa
A
A
A
Close
Avatar universal

Painful lump

I found a lump on my left breast about 5 months ago and made an appointment to see my doctor. The lump was a bit tender but I assumed it was because I had been prodding it! My doctor said she was sure it was a 'breast mouse' but sent me to the hospital to have it checked by a specialist. I went to see the specialist and he told me it was fibro something, and the lump was due to the fact that I have large breasts. I was so relieved that I didn't really ask much about the condition itself, I can't even remember what he called it.

Now I'm concerned again because the lump hurts around my period. Both breasts are tender but the lump seems hurt more. After my period the pain goes away.

I wish I'd insisted on a scan now to put my mind at rest, I've had a doctor and a specialist look at my breast and both aren't concerned, do you think I should I go back to the doctors/hospital for a scan?

Thanks in advance!


This discussion is related to Painful lump.
5 Responses
Sort by: Helpful Oldest Newest
561921 tn?1216605621
I discussed the option of HRT with my doctor today, he said, "No Way", not with the strong history of breast cancer in my family.  I just assumed, that since I had a bilateral mastectomy, and had no breast, I would be able to take HRT.  How depressing.  I feel like I had the bilateral mastectomy for nothing, since I still have a chance of getting breast cancer, or in the area where my breast use to be.  I am so depressed.  
Thank you for your information, it was helpful.  
God bless,
Dee
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Hi Dee,
How are you? The ovaries produces most of the body's estrogen. And oophorectomy results to an abrupt drop of Estrogen levels as well as early menopause.  Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) uses estrogens and progestin to ease the symptoms of menopause. The progestin protects the uterus from the increased risk of estrogen-related endometrial cancer. HRT may also help prevent or delay the development of Osteoporosis, Alzheimer's disease, colon cancer, macular degeneration, urinary incontinence and skin aging. However, HRT has many short-term and long-term side effects. But sometimes, changing the dosage or the way it is administered can help control side effects.

It is important to weigh all of the potential benefits and risks, as well as your preferences and needs before beginning HRT with your doctor. Women who take HRT should be closely monitored.  Usually, those who have not had their uterus removed are prescribed low doses of estrogen with progestin.

Take care and God bless!.
Helpful - 0
561921 tn?1216605621
I had a bilateral mastectomy in 11/07, I recently had both overies and tubes removed on 7/14/08.  Since I had the mastectomy, would it be safe for me to be on hormone replacement therapy?  I have a strong family history of breast cancer, including sisters, mother, and aunts.  I am 45 years old, and am very concerned of heart desease and osteoporsis.  The breast cancer I had was DCIS in my left breast, but followed the surgeons advise and had the bilateral mastectomy because of my strong family history.  What is your oppinion?  
I am so grateful for this site, and all the great help from you.  Thank you so much for answering these questions.  
Thanks Again!
Dee
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Thanks very much for posting a reply, I have been back to the doctor and he said the same as you have!

Thanks again!

Jacqueline

Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
How are you? Fibrocystic breasts are characterized by lumpiness and usually discomfort in one or both breasts. The condition is very common and benign due to changes in hormone levels during the menstrual cycle.Women with fibrocystic breasts usually experience lumps in both breasts that increase in size and tenderness just prior to menstrual bleeding. The lumps may be hard or rubbery and may be felt as a single breast lump. Fibrocystic changes can also cause thickening of the breast tissue. In cases of extremely fibrocystic breasts, it can be very difficult to examine by palpation. Even mammograms of such cases may be difficult to interpret. In these cases, breast  ultrasound exams and other tests can be very helpful. If not, regular follow-up as often as every four to six months is recommended.

The treatments for fibrocystic breast condition are directed at the individual components of the condition, including the relief of  breast pain and tenderness and the correction of hormonal irregularities. It is however recommended to have a baseline mammogram between the ages of 35-40 years and subsequently every year from age 40 onwards.

Take care and keep us posted.
Helpful - 0
Have an Answer?

You are reading content posted in the Breast Cancer Community

Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
A quick primer on the different ways breast cancer can be treated.
Diet and digestion have more to do with cancer prevention than you may realize
From mammograms to personal hygiene, learn the truth about these deadly breast cancer rumors.
Breast cancer is not an inevitability. From what you eat and drink to how much you exercise, learn what you can do to slash your risk.
Herpes sores blister, then burst, scab and heal.
Herpes spreads by oral, vaginal and anal sex.