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Positive for DCIS. What now?

Hi folks!  Friday I got the results of my biopsy.  I was diagnosed with DCIS, which I am sure most of you are familiar with this condition.  This is considered to be precancerous by some and stage "0" cancer by others.  Anyway, it's not going away according to my surgeon and has to be removed....either lumpectomy, or mastectomy, depending on the amount of breast tissue involved.  He said there is a "broad" area....so mastectomy would not surprise me.  Tomorrow I go for a MRI of both breasts, more X-rays....and blood work.  I am sixty years old and my mother also had her first bout with BC at sixty years old...talk about genetics!  My husband and I have discussed getting a second opinion, but do not know who to see.  The surgeon I saw has a good reputation with patients and with hospital staff and I also like him very much.  He takes time to explain things, draws pics for me, listens to me, and asks if I have questions or concerns, and seems very conscientious. What more can I do?  Thanks for you kindness and concern
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25201 tn?1255580836
First of all .... DCIS is not pre-cancerous in my book. This is Cancer involving the duct but is contained. Of course this needs to be removed and some form of post-op treatment would definitely be advised. I certainly see no reason to get a second opinion .... facts are facts and treatment should be the first line of action. If Mastectomy is proposed and you are not confortable with that then a second opinion might be of some value but you seem very confident and comfortable with your Surgeon so that would be your decision when the time comes.  Regards ....
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Avatar universal
I did use the wrong conversion. Maybe not as bad as I think.  I will know more tomorrow.  Thanks so much for your help.  
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25201 tn?1255580836
Negative ER/PR does indicate a more aggressive cancer but the report states that NO invasive tumor was identified. I'm not sure where you got the "over three inches" statement but this is NOT the comparison for 8 mm .... 8mm is 3 tenths of an inch. 8cm would be a little over 3 inches. This is quite a small area and NOT a "broad" area as you seem to think. I'm not sure why the Dr. expects to find invasive cancer since the report states that none was identified. It's never too late to get a second opinion if there is any doubt in your mind about the extent of the surgery. As a rule with all the information available, such as what you have, there is no doubt as to the extent of the surgery that will be performed.    Regards ....
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Avatar universal
Hi again.  I got a copy of my pathology report today.  It was like a kick in the stomach.  My DCIS is described as high nuclear grade with comedo necrosis and calcification.  solid and cribriform patterns with associated selcrotic intraductal papilloma.  Largest microscopic focus 8.0 mm (over three inches).  No invasive tumor identified.  Breast Cancer Prognosis Profile (1HC Manual Semi-quantitative method) Estrogen receptor - <1 percent...Progesterone receptor - neg.  I will spare you the gross description and the Microscopic Description.  
I think with this "broad" affected area I am facing a mastectomy.  My doctor hinted at that, but said he would not know until he got into the surgery.  He also hinted that he expected to find invasive cancer during the surgery.  I had MRI, Xrays and blood work today.  I am now woried about the condition of my left breast....and possibility of double mastectomy....thanks so much for any comments you my have.
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