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breast cancer

hello

my relative got breast cancer 5 years back it was stage 3 b 7 lymph nodes were removed it effected the right breast.
mastectomy was done 5 yrs back. now it effected liver and cirhosis of liver and then acsites and 2 times tapping was done now my relative is having lymphoedema in legs pitting oedema thus i want 2 know survival rate

plz help
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326352 tn?1310994295
Survival rate is not something that a lay person can accurately assess, much less a doc.  An oncologist might guess, but in the end, he's only guessing.  With involvement of the liver and cirhosis along with it, that is not good.  The liver is the organ that is required to be functioning well with chemo (hence all the checks for liver enzymes).

As for the lymphedema in her legs, please encourage her to ask her doc for a referal to a physical therapist that can assist with this condition.  That is imperative.  There are things that can be done to alleviate some of the pain and swelling, although it will not make it go away totally.  That is something she will be fighting for the rest of her life, but it is manageable.

If you can attend an oncology appt, that might help her by having someone else listening to what is being said.  Is she currently undergoing additional chemotherapy for the metastisis?
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Avatar universal
Hi.
I agree with the previous post.  There is a need to check the liver enzymes in patients with liver metastasis and cirrhosis.  Many chemotherapy drugs are metabolized in the liver.  Depending on the level of elevation of liver enzymes, patients with deranged liver function will have a hard time metabolizing the chemotherapy drugs.  Dose reduction or shifting to another drug that is not cleared by the liver may be done.
The edema of her lower extremities may be related her ascites or fluid accumulation in the abdominal cavity.  Aside from repeated paracentesis, pharmacologic intervention can also be done.  Diuretics may be given to control the accumulation of fluid.
You need to discuss her options with her oncologist.
Take care.        
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