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Avatar universal

Lump in neck

In October 2009 a lymph node in my neck was incredibly swollen and the swelling spread (only on one side of my face) and caused the right side of my face to double in size, I went to a doctor and they didn't know what it was so they just gave my antibiotics. The swelling then decreased, but I had noticed that one particular lymph node on my right side just under my jaw remained slightly swollen, but it didn't hurt and wasn't fixed so I wasn't concerned. Then January 2010 I had pain in my abdomen so severe that eating was nearly impossible, again I went to see my doctor and appendicitis was suspected so I had an appendectomy, but it ended up not being appendicitis, however the surgeon informed me that there was a pool of blood in my abdomen (I was never given a cause for this). I started going to a new doctor and he suspected that the pain I felt in my abdomen might be related to whatever caused my facial swelling, but was unable to tell me for certain because I wasn't experiencing any symptoms at the time. Then in May 2010, my lymph node became swollen again, but much less severe, so I didn't bother going to the doctor. However, after the swelling decreased and the pain vanished, my lymph node is now rock hard, doesn't hurt and doesn't move but is definitely enlarged compared to my left. I mentioned this to my dentist and he suspects a blockage in my salivary gland and recommended I see a specialist, and within the past week I've begun having pain in my jaw (only in the right) and a sore throat (only on the right side of my throat). I was wondering if this could possibly be lymphoma rather than a blocked salivary gland? Or if someone could recommend something to mention to the specialist (my appointment is this thursday). I am a 17 year old girl with excellent eating habits and I exercise frequently.
1 Responses
Avatar universal
I had something like this on my armpit, was a hump kinda thing went to hospital  with an ultrasound turned out to be a folded over muscle.
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