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Avatar universal

Lump under armpit

I have a question and was hoping someone might be able to give me some good feedback.  Today I noticed a pea sized lump under the skin in my right armpit. It is not noticeable to the eye, or felt by simply rubbing a finger over it.  I randomly found it, but you have to press down in order to feel it.  It's towards the inner part of my armpit and there is nothing matching this under the left armpit. I'm not sure how long it's been there, or if there is anything wrong with it. I did a self breast exam just to check after I found it and there are no lumps in my breasts. My last "yearly" gyno visit was in March 2009 and a breast exam was also done then. You definitely have to push down to feel the lump and it feels like it might move around a little.  It may even be smaller than a pea sized. Like a BB or something.  I have no insurance and am currently unemployed, so I know it's better safe than sorry but I would hate to spend alot getting this investigated and then it's nothing.  I am expecting my cycle any day now and read somewhere that maybe I should re-evaluate it after I've had my cycle to see if it changed.  I'm thinking about just watching it over the next month or so to see if it changes at all before rushing to the doctor. Advice??????????
1 Responses
Avatar universal
It could be a gland clogged by the deodorant you use.  That has happened to me before.  It went away on its own after a few days.  If it doesn't, I would go see doc.
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