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Avatar universal

infor on mammogram callback

Actually thanks for the info Louise but this is not from any kind of breast surgery,  I understand it has something to do with skin folding over the breast so the image isn't clear.
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Avatar universal
a technician, no... I only sound like one because I've been on the receiving end too many times... as a patient.

Anyhow,  the Ultrasound is just another diagnostic approach, utilizing sound waves to get an image... as opposed to the mammogram, which gives an x-ray kind of image. Sometimes, depending on what the suspected abnormality is, one type of diagnostic exam renders a better... clearer... and obviously, a more usable image than the other. It's seem logical that they're suggesting the Ultrasound because it can detect what's occurring within and around the skin flap... something that the mammo can't do.
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Avatar universal
Thanks for the comment.  I wasn't sure what skin flap meant when they called me back.  I had never heard it but now it makes sense.  I assume that the ultra sound is necessary just in case the film shows the flap again.  Thanks for the comment, it really helped.  Sounds like you are a technician??
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Avatar universal
What can occur during a mammogram is that breast tissue can actually pinch and fold onto itself during compression(s) and thereby create an obscured area in the mammogram, making  an accurate interpretation difficult... if not, impossible. When that happens, you'll most likely get a "call back" from the radiological facility and be asked to return for a retake. This happens more often than you'd think.
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