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Cerebral Palsy Community
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Could I have mild cerebral palsy?

I've struggled a little bit with coordination and motor skills all my life, though I'm 18 years old and you would never know it. People in school just thought I was clumsy sometimes or shy because I didn't want to try the things I knew I couldn't do. Do I have CP possibly? Okay, the thing that worries me most is my left side motor skills are far, far worse than my right. Like: my middle AND ring finger on my left hand cannot move from right to left, it's like they're paralyzed. I also have grip problems, and have gotten crap for slouching my entire life. The thing, also, about my left side is that my foot has similar problems to my left hand with coordination, where the middle two don't like to move much at all and the rest of my foot and hand are below average motor skills, lacking serious control unless I focus on them. My hands shake under anxiety, I drag my feet, and I also get serious pain in my knees and elbows when I do things like walk for about 10-20 minutes or do push-ups(which I can't do). I'm wondering if it's more likely Cerebral Palsy or something like EDS, a more physical disorder.
Note: I've had 11 non-epileptic seizures that I was treated for, and I do have chronic migraine that's unexplained. I've gotten some EEGs and MRIs done in the past so I could get those checked out again(I was about 8-11) but I wanted to see if it's worth my time. Thanks!
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