Aa
Aa
A
A
A
Close
Avatar universal

Should I worry about AGUS PAP result after hysterectomy?

I had total hysterectomy in 2010 for adenocarcinoma. My ovaries were left. I had no chemo or radiation. All pap's have been good up till last one. It came back AGUS. How concerned should i be? I am 52 yrs old Thanks
3 Responses
Sort by: Helpful Oldest Newest
Avatar universal
Since it's atypical glandular (AG) versus atypical squamous (AS) I would think the next step would be a colposcopy to get a better look and get a biopsy. As far as the likelihood that it is cancer or has a high risk of becoming cancer, I don't have any info on that. Hopefully, it is nothing serious and/or is easily treated. Please post back when you know more. Sending cyber hugs.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
I forgot to mention that vaginal atrophy that is common after menopause (and even more common for women who have had a hysterectomy) can cause abnormal pap smears and colposcopies. Of course, with your history of cancer this could be more concerning; however, that is not a given. Using a vaginal estrogen for a short period of time to heal the tissues and re-doing the pap smear and/or colposcopy can elucidate whether it's precancer or cancer or just atrophy. If you google something like "differentiating vaginal atrophy as the cause of cervical dysplasia" you will get some results... specifically, a couple of PDF documents that are helpful. Hope this helps!
Helpful - 0
2 Comments
Thank you.  Going for colposcopy on Dec. 20.
I had colpo and Dr stars he saw nothing suspicious and that those cells shouldn't even be there since those are in the uterus and I had hysterectomy.  Going to have repeated in 6 months.  So I get to wait some more.
Avatar universal
Glad to hear that it is likely nothing of concern.
Helpful - 0
Have an Answer?

You are reading content posted in the Cervical Cancer Community

Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
New cervical cancer screening guidelines change when and how women should be tested for the disease.
Diet and digestion have more to do with cancer prevention than you may realize
Herpes sores blister, then burst, scab and heal.
Herpes spreads by oral, vaginal and anal sex.
STIs are the most common cause of genital sores.
Condoms are the most effective way to prevent HIV and STDs.