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209987 tn?1451935465

Allergy?

My two yr old son had a blood allergy test done about a year ago...didn't show anything, but pediatrician said that most times the blood ones don't show much unless specifically searched for.

My question is...he loves peanut butter...he eats it and never seems to get sick from it, except that he gets a pimply rash on his face where the peanut butter has touched him...could this be an allergy?  Is his face possibly just sensitive to the oils?
2 Responses
Avatar universal
Some brands of peanut butter may contain a small amount of added partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, which are high in trans fatty acids, thought to be a cause of atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, and stroke; these oils are added to prevent the peanut oil from separating. Natural peanut butter and peanuts do not contain partially hydrogenated oils. A U.S. Agricultural Research Service survey of commercial peanut butters in the U.S. showed the presence of trans fat, but at very low levels.
At least one study has found that peanut oil caused relatively heavy clogging of arteries. Robert Wissler of the University of Chicago reported that diets high in peanut oil, when combined with cholesterol intake, clogged the arteries of Rhesus monkeys more than butterfat.
It could be the oil if it's not peanut oil. I suggest you ask the Pediatrician for a prescription
for an EpiPen and have Benadryl in your home
have you tried Wowbutter google it.
209987 tn?1451935465
Wow!!
I think I'm just going to throw that junk out and get some of that wowbutter you suggested.
I have high cholestrol and never even THOUGHT that I could be leading my son down the same path...jinkies...

Thank you SO much for the info.
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