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Diet for pancreatitis and kidney disease???

Hi Tony! I've been voraciously reading your group's postings/answers. My dog was perfectly fine with SLIGHT high BUN (35-38). I put her on the NF diet in an effort to keep the kidney disease at bay, and suddenly her pancreatitis went crazy! She got very ill and didn't want to eat. I tried to put her back on her old food to get her back to normal, but it was too late. She's been hospitalized for four days. Her BUN/Creat "stabilized" at 116/6.7.

I truly feel like the change in diet triggered her pancreatitis which caused her kidney values to shoot through the roof (when we put her in the hospital, they were literally off the chart).

We get to pick her up today. I definitely don't want to feed her anymore of the NF food. I checked out some of your recipes which I am more than willing to try, but I want to make sure it doesn't affect her pancreatitis.

Any thoughts? My initial thought would be chicken (white meat because of the pancreatitis) or rinsed canned salmon, sweet potatoes, egg whites, and an Omega 3 supplement.

The vet said she's been eating canned chicken meat with no problems.

I would appreciate any advice you could offer.

Anna
Houston, Texas
4 Responses
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1916673 tn?1420233270
Hi Anna. Pancreatitis is a common complication with kidney disease and needs to be guarded against, usually by being forewarned if it creeping in through having very regular (monthly) blood level checks.

It can both be triggered and made significantly worse by high fat content in the diet, which you probably know by now.

The best approach is therefore to keep fats to a minimum, at least until the pancreatitis has been resolved, after which time you can re-introduce small amounts of fat - keeping a watch on blood levels to see if it flares up again. In the meantime, dogs still need energy from useful nutrition, so fats should be replaced with carbohydrates. Carbs are not as efficiently used by dogs as fat is, so hopefully this is only a temporary measure.

I am wondering how much fat is in the "NF" food (not sure what NF stands for or which product it might be). If it is a high fat food, then you could try switching to one that is a) canned and b) low fat, lower protein.

Home cooking is indeed a good alternative, but be aware my recipes all include pretty high fat amounts (due to meat and coconut oil content), so I would not use them without adapting them.

The lowest fat content poultry is turkey breast without the skin. Unfortunately it is medium in terms of phosphorus content, so it could be used occasionally, as long as the phosphorus level in the blood results is under good control. Chicken breast without skin is a good option too. The best is actually green tripe, which is both low in phosphorus and fat ... about the same as chicken actually.

If you replace the fats with carbs, then go for sticky white rice or peeled cooked potato as good options. Salmon is quite high in phosphorus, so useful, but only occasionally.

Hope this helps.

Tony
Helpful - 0
1 Comments
Hi Tony,
I hope you are getting notifications for this thread.  I’m pretty much a desperate woman trying to help my elderly dog who has kidney disease with pancreatitis.  
I’ve read all your recommendations and you seem very knowledgeable.
I’m terrorized trying to help my baby.  One minute he seems to be doing better and the next I think he’s about to take his last breath.
Do dogs with this combination of diseases do better one day and then worse the next?  And do they bounce back?
I can’t seem to find information on dogs with both ailments...it’s either one or the other.
It seems if you give them food to heal the kidney you damage the pancreas further.
He’d been drinking the broth from boiled chicken one day and seemed to be improving and then started throwing up the next.  Is this fairly common?  
I’m caught in the middle and not sure which direction to turn.
Can you or anyone offer guidance?  
Thank you.

  

Avatar universal
That is very helpful, Tony! Thank you so much. The vet has been feeding her canned chicken; so, I'll continue with that (or even fresh) and add some white rice.

Just fyi, the NF food is Purina's kidney function food.

I really appreciate your responding so quickly. Of course, we are beside ourselves that our baby is ill and are so appreciative of any info. that could help her.

Respectfully,
Anna
Houston, Texas
Helpful - 0
1916673 tn?1420233270
No problem Anna. Instead of plain white rice, use sticky white rice (most good supermarkets sell it, or available at Asian and some Chinese cuisine outlets) as it's lower in phosphorus. Purina is not a good source for dog food of any kind. You may or may not be aware there is a huge (1000s of dog owners) lawsuit still going on against Purina, owing to alleged deaths due to contamination/ingredients. I would look more at other canned varieties such as Hills kd, once the pancreatitis is under control. Tinned chicken may be okay, but do check what the ingredients say about both the fat and phosphorus content and - if medium to high - stop using it.

Tony
Helpful - 0
1 Comments
We feed our Sheltie Royal Canin Kidney diet, there are 3 formulas.  It is what my vet recommended in the prescription KD lines.  I believe they have a sensitive digestion formula too, but not sure about the phosphorus/protein content, which has to be watched for KD.
In addition to boiled chicken breast, we also use lean 93% ground beef on occasion and scrambled egg whites (its the yolk that has high phosphorus), as high quality proteins.
1916673 tn?1420233270
Just for anyone following this thread ... egg whites are a good source of high quality proteins (free range and as organic as possible eggs), but so too are most human grade meats and poultry. Human grade means they are cuts of meat you would buy to eat yourself (not intended for dogs, as dog meats are the waste matter from carcasses or from animals that have died due to illness).

The general consensus is that protein does not need restricting in stages 1 and 2 of chronic kidney disease - but it does need restricting in stages 3 and 4. The ideal is for high quality protein to be fed in these later stages, but that it doesn't amount to more than around 10% of the daily intake of food. When restricting protein, it's important to substitute it with other viable energy sources. Fatty meats (as long as there is no susceptible pancreatitis) can be given - but do be careful of the protein content - along with carbohydrates including sticky white rice and white potatoes in moderation.

Tony
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