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Taking Vitamin E

I read vitamin e is good for liver.

However, how much is considered good to take per day?

Cirrhosis
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683231 tn?1467323017
From web md

“Liver disease called nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Taking vitamin E daily seems to improve symptoms of NASH in adults and children.”

That was the only reference on there I saw related to liver and vitamin E. So it may help if you have fatty liver disease.

They listed under possibly ineffective

“Liver disease. Taking vitamin E does not reduce the risk of death in people with liver disease.”

More from webmd under possible complications of vitamin E

“Vitamin E is POSSIBLY UNSAFE if taken by mouth in high doses. If you have a condition such as heart disease or diabetes, do not take doses of 400 IU/day or more. Some research suggests that high doses might increase the chance of death and possibly cause other serious side effects. The higher the dose, the greater the risk of serious side effects.

There is some concern that vitamin E might increase the chance of having a serious stroke called hemorrhagic stroke, which is bleeding into the brain. Some research shows that taking vitamin E in doses of 300-800 IU each day might increase the chance of this kind of stroke by 22%. However, in contrast, vitamin E might decrease the chance of having a less severe stroke called an ischemic stroke.

There is contradictory information about the effect of vitamin E on the chance of developing prostate cancer. Some research suggests that taking large amounts of a multivitamin plus a separate vitamin E supplement might actually increase the chance of developing prostate cancer in some men.

High doses can also cause nausea, diarrhea, stomach cramps, fatigue, weakness, headache, blurred vision, rash, and bruising and bleeding.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy: When used in the recommended daily amount, vitamin E is POSSIBLY SAFE for pregnant women. There has been some concern that taking vitamin E supplements might be harmful to the fetus when taken in early pregnancy. However, it is too soon to know if this is an important concern. Until more is known, do not take vitamin E supplements during early pregnancy without talking with your healthcare provider.

Breast-feeding: Vitamin E is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth in recommended daily amounts during breast-feeding.

Infants and children: Vitamin E is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth appropriately. The maximum amounts of vitamin E that are considered safe for children are based on age. Less than 200 mg daily is safe for children 1 to 3 years old. Less than 300 mg daily is safe for children 4 to 8 years old. Less than 600 mg daily is safe for children 9 to 13 years old. Less than 800 mg daily is safe for children ages 14 to 18 years old. Vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when given intravenously (by IV) to premature infants in high doses.

Angioplasty, a heart procedure: Avoid taking supplements containing vitamin E or other antioxidant vitamins (beta-carotene, vitamin C) immediately before and following angioplasty without the supervision of a health care professional. These vitamins seem to interfere with proper healing.

Diabetes: Vitamin E might increase the risk for heart failure in people with diabetes. People with diabetes should avoid high doses of vitamin E.

Heart attack: Vitamin E might increase the risk for death in people with a history of heart attack. People with a history of heart attack should avoid high doses of vitamin E.

Low levels of vitamin K (vitamin K deficiency): Vitamin E might worsen clotting problems in people whose levels of vitamin K are too low.

An eye condition called retinitis pigmentosa: All-rac-alpha-tocopherol (synthetic vitamin E) 400 IU seems to speed vision loss in people with retinitis pigmentosa. However, much lower amounts (3 IU) do not seem to produce this effect. If you have this condition, it is best to avoid vitamin E.

Bleeding disorders: Vitamin E might make bleeding disorders worse. If you have a bleeding disorder, avoid taking vitamin E supplements.

Head and neck cancer: Do not take vitamin E supplements in doses of 400 IU/day or more. Vitamin E might increase the chance that cancer will return.

Prostate cancer: There is concern that taking vitamin E might increase the chance of developing prostate cancer. The effect of vitamin E in men who currently have prostate cancer is not clear. However, in theory, taking vitamin E supplements might worsen prostate cancer in men who already have it.

Stroke: Vitamin E might increase the risk for death in people with a history of stroke. People with a history of stroke should avoid high doses of vitamin E.

Surgery: Vitamin E might increase the risk of bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using vitamin E at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.”


Since we with advanced liver disease are at increased risk of bleeding personally I would suggest avoiding taking supplemental vitamin E.

For any medication including  OTC or supplement you are considering taking anyone with advanced liver disease with a fibrosis score more than F3 fibrosis is F4 cirrhosis should discuss the safety of these medicines and supplements including vitamins or herbals with their hepatologist as they are in the best position to give you solid recommendations and advice

Best of luck  
Helpful - 0
6 Comments
Saw the same on the Mayo Clinic web site. It isn’t so much vitamins E is good for the liver but really vitamin E is helpful in treating fatty liver like NASH (Non- Alcoholic SteatoHepatitis) which is the most severe form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

So if the cause of your liver disease is NAFLD or NASH then it has been shown vitamin E can help but only if that is the cause of your liver disease.

From the results of a study on national institution of health web site

“Conclusion

Vitamin E (RRR-α-tocopherol) at a dose of 800 IU/day is beneficial only in non-diabetic or non-cirrhotic adults with active NASH. ”

Thank you.

Sounds like I need to stop taking “E” and discuss with my doctors.  Next MRI, office visit and lab work is later this month.

Again thank you.
Good luck with your up coming tests and doctor visit.

Do you have a way to communicate with your care team between visits? My doctor uses a web site called MyChart where I can see my lab results anytime. There is also a message utility where I can ask non urgent medical questions and get an answer back in a couple of days usually from the nurse but they ask my doctor for information as needed. So for example if I was thinking about taking a new medicine or supplement I could ask my question through the patient portal basically anytime. Beats waiting months between visits and then forgetting to ask the question when you are there.
Yes I can use a MyChart Portal and do from time to time.  However,  I do not want to burden them with questions that I can get answered on via other tools.

Thank you
Yes I can use a MyChart Portal and do from time to time.  However,  I do not want to burden them with questions that I can get answered on via other tools.

Thank you
I just figure that is what MyChart is for. They can answer when convenient for them and plus it is an informed answer based on my medical history instead of an answer that may not be correct for my situation.

Wishing you good health
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