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Can it bbe liver mets?

I was diagnosed with stage II colon cancer in 2006. The tumour was quite large measuring 7cmx8cm. T3 NO MO. I had no chemo because the doctor felt it would not significantly raise my survival rate which was 85%.  For the last few months or so, I have been bloated and have rt upper abdominal pain. At times it feels like there is something in there when I am sitting and can be uncomfortable.  My colonoscopy in sept. was clear.  I recently had a ct scan and will get my results soon.  The thing is, I do not trust the doctor at the cancer clinic.  The genetic doctors have recently found that I carry a Repair gene mutation. I have lost 2 brothers and a sister to colon cancer and another sister to breast cancer.  My doctor was the doctor for 3 siblings who died.  Another brother, nephew and myself  have survived.  I dont trust that he gives the best care.  The last tme I went for blood work he did not take my hemoglobin and yet it was down some from the previous time.  I asked him and he just said "I didn't do it. I'ts fine" I am worried that something might be really wrong and he might miss it. Could this be something serious?
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Avatar universal
Just as an observation, I believe that in your circumstances you should seek the foremost expertise in colon cancer and associated complications.  My suggestion would be that you re-post your question on the "expert - ask a doctor" part of the G.I. forum and ask Dr Pho what he thinks - including a request for his recommendation on the tip-top intestinal cancer centre + specialists etc.

regards
Morecambe
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Avatar universal


Lucky_Canuck, you wrote, ". . . I asked him and he just said "I didn't do it. I'ts fine" I am worried that something might be really wrong and he might miss it. Could this be something serious? " You also said this same doctor oversaw the care of a *bunch* of family members who had had colon cancer, and died of it.  You seem so *conscientious,* which, your doctor, um . .  does not seem to be, from your report.  

Morecambe offered some suggestions for you on March 3rd that sound "right on" to me.  Do keep on following through; you'll find the people as conscientious as you.

Courage.And smiles.
oldwood

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Avatar universal
My 70 year old Aunt has stage IV breast cancer, it has spread to her lungs bones,liver.She also has rectum cancer whch has gone to her liver.For about 3 months she has been been having very strange stool's.
For instance seed like, leather leafy like substance and also stick like stool. Today 3/14/09 She has poop out a button hard shape. No one has ever seen anything like it.What could this be? What did you do? How did you handle the pain?Oh by the way she is not eating stick seeds or leather. This strange painful stool happen while in hospital and eatin hospital food.
Thanks
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Avatar universal
Hi there, I'm a Canuck too and working currently in the USA, where my Yankee husband was just diagnosed with Stage IV colon cancer.  The system down here is retarded and as Canadians, we're very lucky to have choices that the Yankees don't have (thanks to really retarded HMOs and huge bureaucratic hurdles).  My advice to you is to go see another oncologist if you're not comfortable with your current doctors.  If this means travelling out of your small town or rural community (I also live in rural Alberta), then travel to a larger centre like say, Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver, Calgary or wherever -- even Saskatoon or Moncton!  You'll find better doctors (oncologists) in larger cities and unlike the unlucy Yankees with the screwed up medical system down here, you do have options -- so take my advice and use them.  If you're not comfortable with your doctor, find a new one!  
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