Aa
Aa
A
A
A
Close
Avatar universal

Colon Cancer

Hi, I am a 30 year old female. I have twice noticed blood in my stool and on the toilet paper. First time was when I had my period and I thought it may be due to that but now a couple of weeks later it happened again. I also have notice mucus in my stool and when I pass gas. I have no history of colon cancer in my family, though I had a benign polyp removed about 4 yrs ago. I am diagnosed with IBS. I have no weight loss (other way around) but have been very stressed past couple of years. My toilet habits have not changed, I have had no fever. My stool looks normal shape and color (other than mucus and blood). I ma due for an endoscopy and colonscopy soon. But I want to know; is this most likely cancer?
9 Responses
Sort by: Helpful Oldest Newest
Avatar universal
Hi.  There are several things that can cause this, from another polyp that is bleeding to just hemmorhoids which causes bright red blood. Regardless, it is early and this is key with everything where our health is concerned. I wouldn't worry, just make sure you get your tests done.  Can I ask why they are also doing an endoscopy?
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Hi mammo,
thanks for your reply. I called the doctor yesterday and they said they want to rule out hemmorhoids first and so they are doing endoscopy. This will I guess depending on the outcome lead to colonoscopy. I ma sheduled for a survey colonoscopy in a few months anyway so I guess they'll just do it sooner.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
it is just when u read about colon cancer or about blood and mucus in the stool it seems that that is the most likely outcome considering my history of IBS and polyp. I don't know if I am crazy or right
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Hi. An endoscopy is done to view the stomach.  They should be doing a colonoscopy first to determine if it is hemorrhoids.  There is no reason to put you through an endoscopy at this point, if ever.  If you were having very dark or black stool then an endoscopy would be warranted as this would indicate an upper GI bleed, but not for what you are describing.  You are absolutely right in having the colonoscopy and investigating the rectal bleeding as it's always better to error on the cautious side with our health and get peace of mind.  Are they scoping you every 5 years?
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
It is not very dark or black, its normal dark I suppose but with red blood the and blood on the tissue. this happended to me a few weaks ago but I had my period so I thought it may have been that. I have noticed some drops of blood before but not much and not often so I thought it may be ok.  I think I may have missunderstood the nurse she may have said retoscopy. Since they found a polyp 4.5yrs ago, they will scope me every 5 years. this was suppose to come up in January, but may be pushed up depending on what the doctor thinks. Is every 5 years not often enough?
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Five years is fine, but since you are bleeding I would tell them so they can move it up.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
thanks I have told them. Is there anyway to recognize the type or amount of bleeding as hemorrhoids or polyp or cancer?
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
No, there isn't.  Dark or black blood is coming from an upper GI bleed, whereas the bright red is coming from the colon, hemorrhoids, fissures, etc.  Whatever it is, it's very early and that's very important.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Hi

First, I would like to tell you that please free yourself from any pre-conceive notion. A colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy are the most accurate methods for making a diagnosis of ulcerative colitis and ruling-out other possible conditions, such as Crohn's disease, diverticular disease, or cancer.

Please do the tests first. There can be so many reasons for bleeding and they are curable. There are few precautionary you need to take into account.
Helpful - 0
Have an Answer?

You are reading content posted in the Colon Cancer Community

Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
Colon Cancer can affect anyone at any age. Ashley Havlena shares her story.
You're never too young for colon cancer. Read on to find out how a fecal occult blood test saved Keith Friend’s life.
Colon cancer screening tests save lives. Learn how you can reduce your risk for colon cancer.
It’s a fact: You’re never too young for colon cancer. Learn more about the disease.
You're never too young for colon cancer. Amr Radwan shares his story.
You're never too young for colon cancer. Angie shares her family's ongoing struggle with cancer.