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Rectal cancer

My husband was diagnosed with rectal cancer during colonoscopy then last Thursday he had surgery transanal excision to remove tumor but while in there dr realized it was more invasive than he first thought and only took a second biopsy now he s talking about MRI and chemo and radiation to shrink the 2 cm tumor he said it's either stage 2 or 3 I'm really scared he has bleeding and thinner stools I wonder if dr is being conservative to avoid a colostomy this wait is killing me we are not moving forward at all!
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1806721 tn?1554333407
Hi, I also had rectal cancer stage 1 treated with LAR.  Let me just say that I am suffering every single day due to short bowel syndrome.  I think your DH has a great doctor who not only cares about his patient but also their quality of life after surgery.  I would recommend listen to his advice to get the pre-op radiation and try to preserve as long a rectum as possible... He will understand what I mean after he recovers from the surgery.  Also, you did not mention how old he is.  If he is diagnosed at a rather young age, I would most definitely ask his oncologist about genetic testings which should include all of Lynch, FAP, and MAP.  Good luck!
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My  husband is 51 and his cancer is stage 2 he will need chemo and radiation for 8 weeks then surgery 8 more weeks later he has a 50% chance of having a permanent colostomy I'm pretty upset about it
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My wife had stage 4 colon cancer. She went into remission because of Envita’s treatments. Nutrition is a factor and immunotherapy is so important in fighting disease. Traditional centers weren’t cutting it – they never got to the root of the cause of my cancer. She was told taking vitamin C was not advised – basically they didn’t know what they were talking about. Most centers only take a limited approach to cancer but Envita helped build her immune system back up to beat her cancer. Chemo and radiation were not working from the traditional method.
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Iron-Rich Foods, Iron-Related Genes and Colon Cancer (Colorectal Cancer). Iron-rich red meat - beef, pork, lamb - can increase the risk of colon/colorectal cancer. Cancerous cells are iron-overloaded (iron-rich, iron-saturated) cells. Primary tumors always develop at body sites of excessive iron deposits. Some might expect that since the vegan diet contains a form of iron that is not that well absorbed, vegans might be prone to developing iron-deficiency anemia. Iron absorption is increased markedly by eating foods containing vitamin C along with foods containing iron (beans, green chickpeas, lentils, spinach, etc). Adding a vitamin C source to a meal increases non-heme iron absorption up to six-fold which makes the absorption of non-heme iron as good or better than that of heme iron. Many vegetables, such as broccoli and bok choy, which are high in iron, are also high in vitamin C. Vegetarians and meat eaters can get iron overload within the cells of the colon or the rectum. Over 90% of colorectal cancer cases occur in people who are 50 years old or more. Obesity may be associated with the risk of colorectal cancer. Iron overload (abnormal iron metabolism) may result from genetic disorders (hemochromatosis, aceruloplasminemia, Friedreich’s ataxia), excessive iron supplementation, diet mistakes, obesity-related and age-related iron accumulations. Raw cow/goat milk binds iron in the intestine and carries it out in the stool, and in excessive amounts leads to iron deficiency. Raw milk literally ***** the iron out of the body, but raw milk can harbor dangerous microorganisms that can pose serious health risks. All cancer types are caused by iron-related genes (genes involved in iron metabolism / hereditary cancers) and iron-related events (when excessive iron accumulates within the cells, tissues, and organs due to various carcinogenic events / sporadic cancers). Colon/colorectal cancer can cause iron-deficiency anemia because tumors and anticancer therapies can destroy/remove parts of the intestinal tract. Doctors cannot prevent cancers, but can eliminate cancers. Accurate iron-deficiency methods and direct intratumoral injections of anti-iron agents will beat deadliest cancers.
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