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142722 tn?1281537216

Will breastfeeding effect my breast implants

I had breast implants put in about 4 years ago.  I went from a 36A to full 36C.  I am now 6months preg. and going to try and breast feed.  Will breastfeeding effect the way the implants look?  Will my breast look bad?  I have heard some say they look bad after breastfeeding.  Will they sag?  I would hate to replace them after only 4 years
1 Responses
242582 tn?1193616720
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
First, breast feeding will not likely be a problem with breast implants in place. Breast feeding will not affect the position or the size of youre breast implants themselves.  However, the overlying breast tissue may well undergo changes after you complete nursing.  These involutional changes can result in loss of breast volume with accompanying sagging due to excess skin.  If this is significant enough (and the effect cannot be predicted) then some patients do reqest some form of lift to reshape breast tissue over the implant.

Many women never require any additional procedures after nursing.  The consequences of shape change will depend on the amount of involutional loss of breast volume and the elasticity of your skin.  These changes are probably genetically linked.
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