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Wrong Positive Prenatal Paternity Results from DDC

I recently tested with DDC for a prenatal paternity test. I talked the guy who I didn't want to be the father into taking the test. They were really easy to deal with and had no complaints (except for one really crabby lady named Nancy). The results came back that he was 99.9% the father and my boyfriend and I were crushed. We were planning on getting a house and getting married. Now he will never speak to me again. He refuses to get a test done with me and I cannot raise this child on my own and honestly give him/her everything they want and need. I am seriously considering adoption but want to make sure that everyone that has received a 99.9% inclusive result from DDC have found the answer to be correct after birth. I hope and pray they are wrong but need to start making the best plans for my child's future.
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134578 tn?1693250592
COMMUNITY LEADER
Hi, jazzy, "...knowing it would have been precum that would have lived in my body for 5 days," sounds like you are dismissing it as some kind of lesser sperm that would not survive.  However, both pre-ejaculatory fluid and semen are merely the fluid that carries regular, normal sperm into your reproductive tract.  Sperm is no different if it enters your body in pre-ejaculate.  If your partner had sperm hanging around in his urethra when you had sex, it would have been standard, usual sperm having the usual longevity.  .

You might be thinking of the fact that there is a reduced chance in the first place of getting pregnant when the only fluid you re exposed to is pre-ejaculatory fluid.  But this reduced chance is from how recently the man had ejaculated prior to sex with you, it has nothing to do with somehow pre-ejaculate containing lesser-lasting sperm.  If the man has not ejaculated lately, there won't be any sperm in the pre-ejaculate at all, and if he has, there will.  Since you used withdrawal with both guys and are pregnant, it's clear the sperm was there.

I realize this is a huge shock,and certainly encourage you to test again once the baby is born.  I think that if the lab were to have a problem, it would be more likely in the form of not having enough of the man's DNA to match the chromosomes, vresus a false positive.  They count and match, what is it, 32 pairs of chromosomes?  I could see a lab with an inadequate sample from the man not being able to make a definitive match and saying to the woman that they need another sample.  But you are saying that they looked at the DNA and somehow falsely matched it.  That seems less likely.  In your shoes, I would try to make some room in my mind for the possibility that what they are saying is correct..
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Avatar universal
Annie,

I've tracked ovulation before with OPK and physical symptoms, but didn't during the time of this conception. I tried to conceive for two years with no success, but now believe it was my partner and not me. I was pregnant with the first 4 months of ending that relationship. The earliest I've ever ovulated was CD 15-16. According to my paternity results I would have ovulated right after AF ended which has never been the case as I have longer cycles and after two years know this was regular for me. My fertile days should have been April 24-28 with ovulation at 27th. I did not have cramping but did have EWCM. It could be that I was already pregnant, but it seems impossible for me, knowing my body and knowing it would have been precum that lived in my body for 5 days. Maybe a freak accident occurred this one month only and I happened to ovulate extremely early, but really think my test may be wrong.
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134578 tn?1693250592
COMMUNITY LEADER
Hi, jazzy, the part of your story that raises a question for me is you saying you had intercourse 'on the day of ovulation,' and the other guy was 'not in your fertile period.'  How do you know, were you using ovulation tests at the time?  And you know, I assume, that sperm can live for several days in your body?
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Avatar universal
I know this was posted a while ago, but I am in the exact same situation, but went through ravgen. I was almost 100% sure that the partner I was planning a baby with was the father, as we had intercourse on the day of ovulation and the other partner was not in my fertile period. Both partners used the withdrawal method, and I had the guy that I did not think was the father tested, but only his DNA was used. Results came back he is the father, and am racking my brain, because nothing adds up. Even my early ultrasounds matched my LMP. I don't understand if I used the withdrawal method, how sperm could have lived inside of me for 6-7 days. I am so confused and am praying the results are wrong! I have googled and googled and according to everyone the results seem foolproof. Is there a chance ravgen gave me false results?
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Avatar universal
Did you get your results? How long did it take?
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Avatar universal
Thanks but I was asking for ones personal experience.
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134578 tn?1693250592
COMMUNITY LEADER
Rain, I am sure that question is on the DDC's FAQ's list.
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Avatar universal
To anyone who's gotten a prenatal paternity test from DDC, how long did it take to revive the results? I'm stressing because it's getting so close to the holiday. We tested on nov 13th 14. Thanks for reading and I wish everyone the best of luck with their situations.
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134578 tn?1693250592
COMMUNITY LEADER
If you really can't bear the thought of letting this decision rest on the results of one test, good as the company's reputation is, that is entirely your right.  (When my twins' hearts stopped, I didn't want to have a D&C right away, partly because I wasn't entirely ready to believe it had really happened.)  Do talk with an attorney and find out if you can compel the second guy to test, either by prenatal test or (more likely) by postnatal test.

The "father" will probably have to sign the adoption papers, so whether or not he is choosing to be unresponsive, you will need to have legal contact at least one more time.  The state might also require he do another DNA test at the time of surrendering his rights, since prenatal tests (as far as I know) have not yet been certified by any state for determining paternity.  They are too new of an innovation.  (And, of course, some labs are unreliable.  Can't blame states for being cautious.)

I'm sorry it didn't work out with the awesome guy, and glad to hear that betrayal was not part of his emotional response to the situation.  It makes it all the more puzzling that he would not double-check by testing.
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Avatar universal
Hi Annie,

Thank you so much for your information. Just to clarify (I hope this helps you understand) neither of the possible dads were my boyfriends at the time of conception and neither of the relationships were exclusive. I told the guy that through all my math and calculations of conception dates, that he was the father and had the other guy take the test to make sure. I didn't expect these results since that meant the sperm had to live for 5-6 days for me to be pregnant. I know that puts me in a terrible and reckless light but that's how I was. I never thought about the consequences and never really cared. He was really awesome through the whole thing, started to date me, went to all my appointments, took care of me, and was beyond excited to have a little baby with me.

It would have just been easier and smoother with him, my child would definitely have both parents present if that were the case.

The "father" is unresponsive (I felt it was the right thing to at least tell him the results). I do not want a tie with him.

DDC does have the best name and I thoroughly researched them before setting up the test. I cannot find a single false positive. I wanted to go through Ravgen for the second test but he refuses and wants to move on with this life.

DDC told me that there was no reason to test any one else after my results. I just can't accept it.

Thanks again Annie!

Elizabeth

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134578 tn?1693250592
COMMUNITY LEADER
Hi, I'm sorry to hear that you didn't get the results you hoped for, and especially that when you wanted to recheck to avoid making a wrong decision, your boyfriend acted like a jerk.  Life sometimes deals us a reality that is so hard to accept compared to what we want.  I think you're doing the right thing to want to be absolutely sure.  That said, we have occasionally heard in this forum from women who have tested with the DDC, and have never once had a report that the result was incorrect.  There are some labs that are notorious for wrong results (or lost results), but the DDC is absolutely not one of them, in fact they and Ravgen are the two labs doing this kind of work that are the gold standard.  The president of the DDC told one lady who wrote in on this site that they often wind up doing tests because of false results from other labs -- in other words, they wind up doing clean-up work because of messes from other places.

I believe it might be possible that if you want to be double sure about the results by testing your boyfriend, you can do so once the baby is born by court order.  Would you be able to defer the adoption decision that long?  (I don't know if a court would order testing done before the baby is born, because prenatal testing is not yet certified for determining paternity, I don't think.  But there is no harm in asking a judge if this could be done.  Explain what you have done and learned so far, and tell the judge that you don't want to make this decision wrongly.  It's possible he will order your balky boyfriend to do the swab for the DDC.)

Here is my question.  I assume from the fact that you tested with the guy you didn't want to be the dad, that you didn't want to tell your boyfriend that there was even a reason to test.  (Else you would have tested both guys at once, right?)  And that once you admitted the test, he was angry because what the very need for testing revealed is that you had slept with someone else and also that you had kept it a secret, presumably with the intention of never telling him at all if the baby had been his.  You're now thinking of giving up the baby because you feel you won't be able to afford to give the child everything he or she wants and needs.

But, how was your relationship with this boyfriend in the first place, if you found someone else attractive enough to sleep with, and didn't confess to your boyfriend that this happened?  Would you really have had the house with the white picket fence and perfect Mommy and Daddy relationship of your dreams?  Or was it at least partly a pipe dream based on fear of the future?  A baby doesn't make an imperfect relationship into a perfect one, the advent of a child can stress the relationship, and issues between the couple don't go away in the face of new stressors.  It's possible that this guy (the boyfriend who is acting like a jerk about taking the test to confirm) would not have been the father of your dreams, and if that is the case, please remember that raising a child alone is not as hard as raising a child while fighting with your partner.

In other words, you (presumably) now know who the father is, and just because it is not the guy you hoped, this does not mean the other guy is absolved from the duty to pay child support.  Child support is not living in the house with the white picket fence together and moving on to a long, happy life and walking into the sunset, but it doesn't sound like you were going to have that with the boyfriend who has proven to be a jerk anyway, when you come down to it.  (You were unhappy enough with him to cheat, remember.)  But at least child support can make it possible for you to (along with what you earn) keep the baby, if that is what you would really like to do.

Think long and hard, and if you do decide the baby should go up for adoption, bless you (I say this as a woman who has battled infertility and had less success than I had prayed for).  But the choices for you are not merely "it's my boyfriend's baby" or "adoption."  You would have the right to get child support from the guy who is the child's dad.  There might even be familial support from his parents (I don't mean money, but moral support, which is equally as important.)

If you do decide on adoption, most states either support or mandate open adoption, nowadays.  The reports on this are almost uniformly positive, it might indeed be the way to go for you.

Good luck, and don't hesitate to write back.

(((HUGS)))

Annie
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