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Am I still supposed to be sensitive through a dental crown?

It's been about a month since I had my dental crowns replaced (went from an all metal crown to porcealin fused to gold). Every time I have something cold on that side, I feel as if the coldness causes a LOT of sensitivity on that side for the one tooth. I asked my dentist abot this and he said it was because the tooth has a nerve that is still alive, which is making it functional. I'm starting to second guess his thinking but want to know what the experience is here with others or if this is normal. Thanks!
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Avatar universal
Sensitivity to temperature is perfectly normal for a tooth that has received a crown but not a root canal. A lot of times, this will go subside with time. the dentist is right, there is a living pulp under that crown that is irritated from the drilling. Getting a crown put on is very hard on the tooth pulp. In my own experience, getting just a crown without a root canal is more painful long term than a root canal itself.
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COMMUNITY LEADER
Selective grinding of occlusal interference is generally minimal, loss of tooth is a highly unlikely, if not impossible, consequence. However, detection of occlusal interference is highly technical demanding. Once detected by articulating paper, any dentist can grind off.
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Avatar universal
Thanks for your standard response. Only way occlusal interference is being removed at this point is if I lose the teeth.
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Most likely cause of cold sensitivity after a new crown delivery is occlusal interference, which commonly occurs in second or first molar. Elimination of occlusal interference can resolve cold sensitivity immediately. Seeing a dentist competent in occlusal adjustment is advised.
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