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New Crown Early December - Still Pain

How long is it reasonable to have pain after getting a new crown?  My dentist seems to have done a good job - the bite seems good, he was great about explaining everything (although he never mentioned the option of having a gold crown), and the procedures themselves (temp and permanent) all went smoothly.  I saw him in mid January and he said everything looks just fine - give it time.  The "pain" isn't much and it hasn't changed,  but I can't chew on that side since that causes the pain/discomfort.  It also seems like the tooth is somewhat loose.   Finally, at the time he did the crown he indicated that he didn't think we'd need to do a root canal because of the amount of tooth that he had to work with.  So... it's going on two months since the new crown.  Should I continue to just wait or might there be a problem?  Thank you for your thoughts.
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745634 tn?1243723447
If its a ridge, that can easily be smoothed off.  If its a gap, making a new crown is the only good option.  This should be done without any additional cost to you as the dentist should have noticed it before permanently cementing it.

I have seen crowns that have had margins sealed, but they never look good and I cant believe they have a good waterproof seal.
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Avatar universal
What would the dentist do to correct the gap/ridge at the gum line?  Could it be filled in without having to put on a new crown?
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703897 tn?1248019974
A dentist put a crown on my tooth, it took a prosthodontist 1 hour almost or more to fix it because it was too high and bulky.    

It hurt for 7 months and since I have gone to a Prosthodontist he has relieved the pain by adjusting it.   I ended up with two root canals though because I think of all the pressure on the teeth the GD crowned that were too high  possibly led to my root canals.    My crown still hurts this is the weird thing. I am going to give it one more week and then get it taken off.   There is a gap between my crown and my other tooth where the GD ground my natural tooth away to fit the crown in.  Both of mine have to be replaced the Prosthodontist stated.  Lots of money in them.  And the bad part is the GD thinks he did nothing wrong.
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745634 tn?1243723447
You should check back with your dentist about that.  The margin between the new crown and your tooth should be imperceptible to you, and food should not be getting caught there.
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Avatar universal
I hope you can answer another question about crowns.  Is it normal to have a ridge between the crown and the tooth right at the gum line?  Two of my new crowns are upper molars and food catches in the ridges between the teeth.  I have to floss those ridges at least once a day since brushing can't get between the teeth.  Plus the food packs in such that the gums are bright pink and bleed (not to mention uncomfortable).

Thanks again!
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745634 tn?1243723447
Sorry.  Occlusal is the biting surface of the tooth.  An occlusal problem happens when dental work is made too high, which puts excess pressure on the tooth.  This can lead to a host of other problems (pain on biting, cold sensitivity, TMJ disfunction).  It is however a rather simple thing to fix, takes a dentist maybe 5 minutes to adjust a tooth.
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Avatar universal
Sorry to be obtuse but what is "occlusal"?

Thanks for your encouraging posts!

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745634 tn?1243723447
It sounds like a possible occlusal problem.  I would go back and see if he will adjust it.  It could be something very small, but will cause big problems.

After any dental work, you might expect a week of discomfort at most (as working near the nerve can cause inflammation).  Unless you always have this problem when you have dental work done (I have an instructor who takes 2 months everytime she has something done) two months is way too long to be having issues.

Good news is, your symptoms do not match a need for a root canal.
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Avatar universal
COMMUNITY LEADER
If there is no pulpal or periodontal pathology present. your problem probably comes from occlusal interference. If your dentist can not adjust occlusion, seeing an occlusionist or prosthodontist is advised.
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