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Removing wisdom tooth with cavity

My top left wisdom tooth is probably 3/4 of a centimetre down and fortunately it does not seem impede on the last molar. It does however face an odd direction which makes it hard to clean. It therefore is developing a cavity which is quite sizeable but not giving me any pain or discomfort - at this stage anyway. My theory was I would rather it rot out of my mouth before I would have to go to the dentist to have it extracted. I am 37 years of age and have a terrible fear of the dentist. I thought that if it had deteriorated considerably before it gave me any pain it would be easier to remove?
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Avatar universal
A related discussion, fillings or get it pulled was started.
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Avatar universal
I, too, had a wisdom tooth that I just couldn't quite get a toothbrush behind.  In July I noticed a cavity, and I thought I'd wait until December (which is now) when my dental insurance kicked in.  I don't want to try to scare you into going to a dentist or oral surgeon, but less than a month later I felt like someone hit me in the face with a hammer.  The pain radiated throughout my upper and lower jaw.  Due to the infection I looked like there was an orange stuffed in my cheek.  And no OTC pain reliever helped.  I couldn't stand it so I went to my dentist for a referral to an oral surgeon -- they couldn't get me in for another month and a half (small town, one oral surgeon).  The pain didn't come on slow and steady, it was just there in full force.  

Get it taken care of now, you'll feel much better!
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Avatar universal
it is wrong to let a tooth "rot" away. at some point you'll get pain, infection, swelling, and the extraction will then be  whole lot more involved-there will be nothing left to grab onto. but there will still be infected, decayed roots under the gumline in the bone. extracting a tooth like that could be messy and expensive. generally, upper wisdom teeth, unlike lowers, are fairly easy to remove. their roots are usually fused together in the shape of an ice cream cone and they come out easily. again every tooh is diiferent but that's the general rule. get it out now.
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Avatar universal
it would be far easier to remove now then if you let it become "rotten"> when a tooth is badly decayed it can effect the tooth in front of it. it also can crumble upon extraction making it more of a surgical procedure. i understand fear. maybe you can find an oral surgeon that will put you to sleep for the procedure. taking care of a tooth in the early stages is the easiest way to have the simplist treatment. good luck!
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Avatar universal
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Your thinking is wrong. The longer you wait the more problems you will have ie. pain or difficulty with the extraction. So what I am saying is go  to an oral surgeon and get it extracted asap.
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