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Avatar universal

gum recession, and I don't know why

Hello,

I am a 26-year old healthy female with good oral hygiene. I brush my teeth after every meal gently with a soft bristle brush, and I floss every night. Over the past few years I have had gradual gum recession near a couple of my top teeth (incisors, I believe they are called: the ones on the side. Recently, I have noticed recession starting on one of my two front teeth, as well as the one next to it. When flossing, I have noticed that it requires little effort to get the floss between these teeth, leading me to believe that I have lost a lot of gum and/or bone tissue here. The appearance of my smile has not suffered, so I don't think the problem is out of conrtol yet. I see the dentist regularly, and he has never mentioned anything about the recession, excpept for saying a few years ago, that I may need a gum graft when I am in my 30's.  Other possibly relevant information: I had braces when I was in my early teens and still wear the plastic retainers every night; and I know that I have had a teeth clenching problem in the past, but I think I have eliminated this problem, at least during the day time hours. It may be possible that I still clench at night when I am sleeping. I am just getting my own dental insurance next month, so I believe I would have to wait a year to see a periodontist with this particular insurance. If you have any suggestions on how to keep my gums as healthy as possible, so that I can avoid more problems, please let me know. Thanks so much.
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Avatar universal
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
It sounds like you are doing the correct things and I believe that the recesssion might be a result of the clenching and or the braces. At this point if you are still clenching I would certainly consider a mouthguard.
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Avatar universal
1. be careful with "getting your own" dental insurance. Plans not offerred through employment are usually very poor, and are usually not really "insurance" at all. (Is it Ameriplan?) They are usually "savings" plans where if you go to a paricipating practice, your fees are drastically reduced. Keep in mind the dentist does not get reimbursed by your "insurance plan" at all. It is not my place to say much more, other than to be really careful. If this is what you are paying for in terms of "insurance" you should start asking yourself some questions. 2. I'd ask your dentist for a referral to a periodontist o evaluate your concerns. Gum recession occurs for many different reasons, and a periodontist is best to evaluate why, as well as to determine if there is bone loss, which is more important thatn gum recession....
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Avatar universal
Thanks for your reply and concern. I believe the insurance is Assurant Dental. I am self-employed and this is what the insurance agent that works for the union that I am a member of recommended.  Any comments on this?
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Avatar universal
I did some quick research on Assurant dental. It is NOT Insurance. It is a "savings plan". Any plan that advertises things like "no deductibles" no claim forms" no maximums" is NOT insurance. There are no deductibles, maximums, or claim forms because the "insurance" DOES NOT PAY ANYTHING TOWARDS YOUR CARE. It is basically a referral service whereby you are give a list of dentists who agree to accept very low fees on SOME (but in no way all) services. Your "agent" probably gets a cut of your annual fee, or a commission on your enrollment. Assurant keeps the rest and simply refers you to a dentist. When you go to the dentist, what usually happens is you find out that what you need is not on he list of covered services, and you pay handsomely. You may get $3 xrays and a free checkup, but where does that get you? These plans are recruitment tools for dentists. What dentist can afford to render treatment for 10% (or less) of his normal fee??? Again, your "insurance" PAYS NOTHING !!!! These plans are sold to people who have no idea what they are getting. Do a seach on the internet for "individual indemnity dental insurance" and see what you'll find. These are real insurance policies but undoubtedly they will be more expensive, and they will prorbably have waiting peroiods. Good individual dental insurance plans are hard to fing these days, but I am always searching for my patients who have none.  Good luck, and remember that you get what you pay for.
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