Aa
Aa
A
A
A
Close
Avatar universal

Losing intelligence..

Hello, I am nearly 18 years old and I have a measured IQ of 154 when I was about 14. Slowly but noticeably I experienced mental decline. I used to have such profound and deep thoughts before and now I hardly hear myself think. I feel like I have been losing my intelligence greatly, I was in depression about a year ago but that time has passed. I know that depression links to mental deterioration but its over now and I still feel like I was not what I was before. I feel like I am getting dumber everyday. This is a huge problem for me as my intelligence is my personality trait that I value most and to feel like  losing is like living a nightmare for me. Do you guys have any suggestions?
4 Responses
Sort by: Helpful Oldest Newest
Avatar universal
I'm sorry for your loss.  (A loss of any kind can be painful.)

The doctor will be better able to answer your question.

For me, I would be looking at things such as anxiety, ability to concentrate, motivation, etc.  If I were on medication I would be looking at that as a factor.
To me, it sounds like you are very quick to put this major life event firmly in your past.  I personally feel that you have some unresolved issues regarding it.  Grief isn't something that fits nicely into some little box.  With the level of involvement you had with the individual I expect grief will take a while to resolve.
I think this has come at an important transition in your life and I think that this is creating excess stress and anxiety.

I think you show other important attributes, besides intelligence, that will ensure your success.

Watch for the doctors response.  He will have good advice.

Good luck and best wishes for the future!!
Helpful - 1
Avatar universal
Perhaps you need to listen to what is being said.
I think that after one has been depressed one never goes back to what they were like before.  Often depression will help people grow in others areas.
I can relate to what you say.  I feel an exponential increase in 'dumbness'.  I am not sure whether it is real or perceived though.  In my case perhaps real.  I have had mood issues for the past 10 years and have basically isolated myself.  I think that does affect memory and the ability to learn.  At the very least it affects self-confidence.

I think that everything happens for a reason.  I have found that the qualities I have valued the most/ been the most vain about have been the ones that I have had issues with.
I think that sometimes it is a good idea to reevaluate priorities and to look at what they mean to you.
Helpful - 1
Avatar universal
Thank you for your comment Jaquta. I understand what you are trying to say and yes the depression was one of the hardest time of my life perhaps the hardest. Losing someone after you spent almost everyday with that person is extremely depressing. However, getting through that, I really did feel that my intelligence is somehow hampered. My problem is that I am in a situation where I am off to Oxford Medicine next year and need to use my brainpower alot. Its extremely competitive and I know that people there have amazing minds. I am asking if theres anything I can do to compensate for it.
Helpful - 0
242532 tn?1269550379
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
You haven't lost your iq intelligence..it is stable. You are really talking about self doubt and focus, and it would be helpful to get some counseling about these issues..be assured, you have not lost anything..it is all there, but clouded over by these psychological issues related to this very important transition in life...leaving home.... you can read my book transformations; growth and change, online if you become a member of myvirtualshrink.com for a 3 day trial for $4.95....book is otherwise out of print, but it will be helpful to read the chapter about that transition.
Helpful - 0

You are reading content posted in the Depression/Mental Health Forum

Popular Resources
15 signs that it’s more than just the blues
Can depression and anxiety cause heart disease? Get the facts in this Missouri Medicine report.
Simple, drug-free tips to banish the blues.
A guide to 10 common phobias.
Are there grounds to recommend coffee consumption? Recent studies perk interest.
For many, mental health care is prohibitively expensive. Dr. Rebecca Resnik provides a guide on how to find free or reduced-fee treatment in your area