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ptsd and meth

what are the effects of ptsd when using meth. what to look for. can meth actually help treat ptsd.
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242532 tn?1269550379
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
you have already received the very best advice.  Methamphetamine is the wrong medication for PTSD.  It is nothing but trouble for you.
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Avatar universal
No, drugs and alcohol don't help treat mental illness.  
I can imagine all sorts of nasty side-effects.  Don't go there.  If you have a problem then you need to access support.

Talk to a doctor or psychotherapist.
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Avatar universal
Meth is speed.  Some doctors still use amphetamines for depression and ADD and such, but definitely not for anxiety.  And meth is full of toxins, you have no idea what you're taking.  PTSD is an anxiety disease, why would you want to speed your mind up even more?  Meth is death.  And in the long run, quite expensive, even compared to therapy!
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Avatar universal
I know.  Mum was given Selegiline by her doctor to help with her head injury.  
Do we differentiate between legal and illegal drugs though.  If something is being abused then it doesn't sound very therapeutic.  
Maybe I sound retract my comment.  
I'm OK, for the most part, with doctors prescribing meds but even they abuse them and the privilege.
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Avatar universal
The only difference between illegal drugs and legal ones is often political and economic, as you suggest.  Take marijuana.  It helps some people with glaucoma and chemotherapy, but it's illegal.  But you can get a prescription for isolated THC, the most active ingredient in marijuana, but it's a very unstable substance and required a lot of weirdness to make it work.  Probably far more dangerous in every way than the plant that grows naturally in the ground!  Same with coca leaves -- very mild and non-addictive in their native state, but quite addictive and strong as cocaine.  Cocaine was invented as a pharmaceutical product.  Opium was used in tea for centuries; it was a mild sedative and pain killer that way and not addictive.  Then the British, in order to sell more American tobacco, taught the Chinese how to smoke it by putting in on a bed of tobacco.  Heroin was actually invented as a pharmaceutical product -- they thought it was less addictive than morphine!  LSD is a pharmaceutical product invented to help people see their mental problems in a new way, and has caused some harm.  Whereas natural mushrooms or peyote have been used for centuries without much problem.  Just goes to show, medication is partly for balm but also a lot for money, and profit tends to mix the motivation to make a safe and effective product.  Even aspirin is just an isolated ingredient from white willow bark.  It works a lot better, but also kills tens of thousands of people every year.  Medication is great to have, but we do have to be careful with it.
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Avatar universal
I am very ignorant about drugs and alcohol.  I have limited experience of either.  Although I do feel like a mini pharmaceutical company at the moment with all the meds I've been asked to take.  (Asthma meds, iron tablets, antibiotics, tranexamic acid.)

I think all the boundaries are a little blurred these days.  Even the rubbish that is put in our food is questionable.

I think until you need a med or have an issue with one you can be quite naive.

I've forgotten what I was going to say.

Mainly for financial gain I would say.

Our government ais currently looking at raising the legal drinking age to 20 and increasing tax on alcohol.
Last night on the news there was an article that a number of gardening centres here were growing drugs hydroponically.  Gardening centres open to the public.  That's crazy!
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