Aa
A
A
A
Close
Depression Community
10.5k Members
Avatar universal

Measuring re-uptake

OK.  So serotonin reuptake is relevant to depression.  Then why, during decades of titration and drug switching, were there no tests (blood, brain scans, et. al.) performed on me?  If  the name of the game was to reduce and/or increase reuptake, how come no “measurement” tests were performed? Do such tests exist? If there is anything to the theory, there is a need to determine OBJECTIVELY, and not merely by implementation of subjective scaling (“Do you ‘feel’ any less depressed?”) whether or not the reuptake has been modified.  No scans were ever taken.  No blood work was ever performed on me.  I was under the care of numerous psychiatrists.  All they ever did was say things to the effect of: “Well, let’s try this drug”, “Well let’s try  increasing the dosage”.  This was not medical science.  Science involves measurable, verifiable, objective analysis.  
2 Responses
6726276 tn?1421130268
I agree. I was on Seraquell for 4 yrs. one time I was perusing the packaging from the pharmacy and found out it was recommended that I have an eye exam every 6 months. My Pdoc never advised me of this or any follow ups.
  There's a lot of speculation in the serotonin realm. The scientists aren't even sure about if it works. I've read study's and my Pdoc recently weaned me off of both of the antidepressants I was taking. Surprise ! I feel much better.
   I agree with you. More research needs to be done. Better patient monitoring too. In my area it's hard to find Pdocs & psychologists that will even accept insurance.  The whole mental care situation is a mess.
Avatar universal
I had exactly the same question! It's not just depression. I had severe headache after I had a head injury out of a fatal car accident. It sounds more obvious and "objective"? I tried 13 different medications over 5-6 months to find something working for me without unbearable side effects. I actually asked doc if there is any research on even just simple correlational studies among headache symptoms--types of headaches--medications. His answer is no, and even if it exists, individual differences range widely, so it is useless.
Still, I wonder what medical schools do during avg. 10 years of training. And everything is based on "trials (and errors)" when careful patient observations are not even happening (i.e., so hard to get specialists!)
Have an Answer?
Top Mood Disorders Answerers
Avatar universal
Arlington, VA
Learn About Top Answerers
Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
15 signs that it’s more than just the blues
Discover the common symptoms of and treatment options for depression.
We've got five strategies to foster happiness in your everyday life.
Don’t let the winter chill send your smile into deep hibernation. Try these 10 mood-boosting tips to get your happy back
Smoking substitute may not provide such a healthy swap, after all.
How to lower your heart attack risk.