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Avatar universal

Bruising under eyes from tight swimming goggles?

hello -

I wore a new pair of swim goggles with suction to prevent leaking I'd estimate about 25-30 times this summer, 20-40 minutes per swim.  I am a long distance swimmer, female, age 447.  I noticed at the end of August I was developing these marked "troughs" under my eyes and I stopped using the goggles.  I also would have reddish discoloration/ bruising under the eyes after I removed the goggles which seemed to dissipate within a couple of hours.

I now have deep dark circles with discoloration under my eyes that is marked. I was sick for a couple of weeks with a cold/post nasal drip in October which may have made this worse.  Anyway, it has been two months since I stopped using the goggles.  I am very very worried about these awful looking troughs.  

A friend asked me three weeks ago if I had a black eye and someone else remarked I looked "very tired".

I'm very concerned that I have done permanent damage to the skin under my eyes by wearing these suction type goggles with the resultant pressure and and I'm wondering if you have ever seen this problem.  Is there anything I can do?   What is the prognosis and is it possible I have done permanent damage?
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Avatar universal
Hi Buni,

How long did it take for your eye bag swelling and bruising to go back to normal?

You mentioned it was a LONG time...

I have the same issue.  I swam for the first time in 20 years, I’m 40, and after 5 sessions (30 min each) over 3 weeks, I developed really puffy eye bags....I stopped swimming and it’s been 4 days and they are still there. And I get headaches in the morning when I wake up.

Give me so hopeful news! ;)

Thanks!
Helpful - 0
2 Comments
Wow, Chad1980...I started this thread 12 years ago!  I cannot remember exactly how long it took, would say the puffiness and bruising slowly dissipated over the year after I stopped wearing tight goggles.  I'm now 59 years old and still have some puffiness on my upper cheeks and undereye circles but I have no idea if that was the eventual result of wearing goggles for many years, or just genetics and aging.  It doesn't seem as bad as it was....it's not bruising per se which I did get from wearing goggles.

After my last AquaSphere mask broke a few years back I never replaced it.  And after a serious injury in 2015 that became chronic, I began a much gentler style of swimming.  I don't swim much in chlorinated pools, only in fresh water in the warmer months.   It's worked for me so far although I do think about buying another Aquasphere Vista (Lady) mask.  I used to be very competitive with myself (and yeah, other swimmers) but now it's more about being outside in nature in a beautiful pond and enjoying the experience, even if I'm just doing a slow backstroke or floating.  I still do freestyle but I take breaks and I even wear my contact lenses!

Around the time I started this thread I was freaking out about getting older, being single and the goggle marks probably fueled my obsession.  The good news is that after my injury I had to come to terms with my aging body which admittedly is a continual work in progress.  And in this crazy year of 2020, I feel fortunate that I am still able to swim in the great outdoors.   Swimming is one of the greatest joys of my life and I will do it as long as I can!

You may want to watch the salt in your diet as it can lead to water retention.  I definitely see puffiness in my eye area the day after eating a salty dinner (usually from take out food).  Consider getting an AquaSphere or other swim mask.  At age 40 my guess is the swelling/puffiness will dissipate slowly over a few weeks of not wearing goggles.   Good luck!
Thank you!  Hope you continue to enjoy swimming for many years to come!
Avatar universal
I came back to share this since I found some goggles that work for me!  I was distressed a few months back to see that the raccoon eyes from my goggles were no longer going away in a few hours.  I stopped swimming for three days and they were still there along with the big creases under my eyes from the goggles.  I tried swimming with no goggles, but as I wear glasses, I kept bumping into the wall, and my eyes were terribly irritated from the chlorine.  Finally, I ordered View Women's Selene goggles.  I am from the US but live in the UK--don't know if they're available everywhere.  But they work!!!!!  They're bigger than most goggles, but not like a mask, and the material around the goggles flattens on your face (doesn't bit into it!) and the suction is gentle but effective.  Plus, they don't fog!  I'm going back to order several pairs in case they cease making them.  Try them if you're stuck with marks.  I'm thrilled that I can swim again.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Hi everyone. I just discovered this thread after googling "swimming no dark circles". Thanks to everyone for the comments and suggestions. Are there any updates on how the different goggles and masks and eye creams have worked? Or any new suggestions / products?
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Thanks everyone for advice! Like many people here I thought I was the only one with this problem. I don't have swollen or bruised eyes. The marks usually dissapear in 15 minutes but my concern is about my eye skin condition. I feel like the gogles stretch the gentle and thin eye skin and affects the way it looks. Eye creams don't help. I will try a mask and hope it will help. Logically it should help :-) Really don't want to give up swimming and at the same time don't feel like sacrificing youthfull look...
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Avatar universal
After sustaining injuries from decades of running, I took up swimming a couple of years ago.  I am 56 and can relate to all of your comments and concerns about tissue damage around the eyes!  Thank you to everyone for sharing your experiences and suggestions!
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Avatar universal
Hi , I am 43 and started swiming  for a thriatlon next year, but after my first swim the marks left under my eyes took 3 days to go away.i looked  Like I have been partying for days without sleep!! I will not use googles again and will try a mask instead, any make in particular you could recommend ?

Thank you
Jo
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Well, funny enough I just got home from an hour swim with my new goggles to Google my embarrassment. I finished my laps, and I finally felt so wonderful that I found an exercise that made me pain free, that helped my poor back, and my poor ballet ruined joints and my anxiety. To my horror, as I passed by the bathroom mirror, I saw that I had bruising, and red welts wear the goggles were. It looked as though I had been punched in the face several times. I was mortified. I covered myself with a scarf, I had to get home without scaring anyone. Now reading all of these posts, I am saddened, that, (I am 37) wearing goggles is not a good idea. Right? It is still painful--two hours later, and I can still see the dents...it is horrible.
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Avatar universal
The foam backed goggles are still made by a few companies. I use the ones by Barracuda which are marketed with a "positive pressure" seal (aka ergonomic fit) rather than suction to keep them in place. I can't say I've ever had an issue with them. Got mine here: http://www.aquagear.com/barracuda-medalist/
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Avatar universal
Thanks for the tips but why or where are the old foam type of goggles. I want to avoid that bruising and goggle marks on the fat deposits. I train for an hr 5 days a week and don't think a bigger mask would suit the training. I'm getting fitter quickly but miss those foam backed goggles. I'm in Australia and train in the pool after some of those Olympic types...I can't see them with any of the foam type goggles either...maybe I'm just too old(49), and remembering about 15 years ago when they were on the market.
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Avatar universal
Amazingly, Mark Spitz trained and competed throughout his entire illustrious olympic career without goggles, ever!

Goggles will always cause "raccoon eyes" appearance.  I've been a competitive swimmer my entire life, ocean surf lifeguard and triathlete.  So be it, goes with the territory.  

Are we swimming for vanity or for sport, health and fitness?  What's the big deal?  In America, people are so concerned and consumed with their looks,  especially on their faces, most of the world, place their focus on overall health and well-being and not superficialities.  

Don't focus on this......unless there is any sort of health issue involved and/or causing the problems, why make such a big deal over some rings under your eyes after swimming?

I have a friend who was involved in a car accident and had to have plastic surgery on her face, including the eye areas.  She had to have some dermal filler injected used to help reshape/restructure her face from the damage done by the accident.  Oh, I forgot to mention she was a former competitive swimmer......Well guess what, she refused to give up swimming, because of the accident and that she had filler around and under her eyes, every time she uses her swedish style goggles, she gets deep imprints because of the filler under the eyes becomes compressed.  She doesn't care, she laughs about it............she is alive and she deals with it by living life and making life happen!

It's great and wonderful to be alive, being able to getting up each and every day and being able to swim, in the first place, enjoying and appreciating the more important aspects of life, life itself, embrace it and stop focusing on goggle lines, marks, etc!  

All the Best!

Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Having just got into swimming at age 50, after 5 one-to-one lessons with a brilliant teacher in central London, I have been concerned about the marks caused by my Speedo goggles.  I found this thread and became even more concerned!

After reading the comment from Catalina I immediately ordered a pair of View Selene goggles specially designed for women.  I have just tried them out today and I am delighted and relieved by the result.  I wore them for 25 minutes and they only left very slight marks which had disappeared when I looked 2 hours later.  Definitely recommend them.  I'm also trying to spend part of my time in the pool doing back stroke, without goggles.  Hope this helps!
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
I joined the club of goggle eyes.  I've been swimming for about a year, twice a week, for 40 mins.  I am 51 yrs old.  Last Friday night, I swam. Saturday, I noticed the area below the eyebrow of my right eye, swollen;, Sunday, it got worse, now also the temple area was swollen, as well as under my eye. By Monday AM, I ran to the doctor. After many, many questions and examination, she concluded it was a bruise.  It looked like someone had punched me on the eye, but it was only swollen, not black and blue.   I have small face, so I've been using goggles kind of tight because otherway I get water.  My husband mentioned a couple of times that I was wearing them too tight.   I'm going to reduce swimming time to 30 mins. and I'm buying a mask.  I've been using an ice bag twice a day, taking ibuprofin and it's getting better.  I hope I don't keep the bag under my eye.  Thanks for sharing.   Love, Maria
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Very interesting thread, I've read all your comments, if it helps, I've read great reviews on the US Amazon site about these "View Selene" also called "V-820" goggles designed by women, apparently 'NO' marks at all ???

http://www.divesports.com/View-Selene-Womens-Swim-Goggles-p/view-v-820a.htm

Hope this might be an option for those like me who also struggle a bit with masks.
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Avatar universal
Not sure these comments are answering my question. Let me go into a little more detail. My son is african american and swims all year. However, began to notice goggle marks from eye to eye also covering the bridge of his nose. This began obviously during outdoor swimming but now appears to be a permanent discoloration. Any advice to get rid of and then maintain so will not return?
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
The website with the products: http://www.gandmcosmetics.com.au/
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Avatar universal
Follow up:
I have tried the olive oil as well as a rich vitamin E cream with lanolin since I posted last. It works for me, that is, the bruising after swimming doesn't seem as bad as before and does not last as long as before. I apply a small amount of vit E cream under the eyes before I put my goggles on. I now use this cream as a daily moisturiser, morning and before bed, and it works well for my aged skin. It may be too rich for younger skin. I'm in Australia and the cream I use is manufactured here. "Australian lanolin moisturizing cream with Vitamin E" by G & M Cosmetics Pty Ltd.   I think "Rosken Skin Repair with Vitamin E" may be similar. But it also may be the lanolin that does the trick. In Australia it is available from Coles, Woolworths and probably most chemists. After I put it on at night I apply a small amount of olive oil over the top of it under my eyes. The things we do for vanity.... :) The good thing about this cream is that it does not cost the earth.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
I talked to an elderly lady in her 80s who looks like late 60 (seriously!) and I am trying her advice: gently apply a tiny amount of good quality olive oil over the affected area every night. Blot off excess after a few minutes. It seems to plump up the skin a little. Use your regular moisturizer and sun screen in the morning.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
I am 61 and noticed over the past few years that the goggle imprint on my face after swimming has been lasting longer and longer as the years go by. The skin does not recover anymore and today, after six hours since the swim, I still have dark circles under my eyes and I am a bit sore under my left eye as well. I stumbled onto this site half an hour ago to see whether there is a miracle solution, so I can go out shopping without looking like a raccoon!

I am not sure whether I like the idea of larger goggles for pool swimming. Aren't they cumbersome for lap swimming, i.e. cause more turbulence when turning to breath?

I think the problem with the circles/bags under the eyes may have to do with fat loss on the face and reduced elasticity of the skin due to aging and genetics (as mentioned by a previous post). Just pinch the back of your hand and see how fast or slow the skin springs back. Mine has become a somewhat slow creeper and I suspect this is what happens under my eyes. Many  'bad' things can happen as we are getting older. May be we have to grin and bear it. At least we are keeping fit!

Dealers for Aqua Sphere products in Australia: http://www.aquasphereswim.com.au/
TYR Australia has a range of goggles too, but not the 'Hydrovision' style.
We are a bit limited with product choices in AUS. 'Barracuda Positive Pressure Goggles' are claimed to prevent, or at least reduce, raccoon eyes, but I have not tried them myself (yet), as I have to wear  prescription goggles, but this is a product I will try at some stage or another (because of the 'leave no marks' claim).

I've read all the replies and it does make me feel better to know that I am not the only one with this 'problem'. Now I know that any woman (and man) my age with bags under her eyes must be a swimmer!
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Like so many others I am glad to have found this site... I thought it was just me! And initially I thought I was just imagining that I looked like I had 2 black eyes.. I've also started to swim regularly after suffering a knee injury and it really makes me feel great when I go... but the dreaded "goggle eyes" are starting to worry me.. particularly as I swim in the morning and then head to work! Sounds like it is a combination of the goggles plus age (I am 41).... Am very keen now to try some of the other google/mask options that people have suggested before I next swim... No goggles isn't an option as I wear contact lenses, and to be honest, my vision is so poor that I'd struggle to find the edge of the pool if I didn't wear them!  Thanks to those who have recommended brands/products and shared your research.. Will continue to check in to for further comments.. and in the meantime, hope I can find the products mentioned in Australia... (I am assuming all are widely available.)  Thanks again - I am just relieved to find that I am not alone... and not imagining it!!
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Avatar universal
After typing 'why do goggles leave imprint in skin' I came across this site.  My daughter who is 14 and of afro caribbean parentage, has this very same problem with the very dark circles around her eyes.  My daughter has been swimming competitively for a couple of years and swims 1.5hr sessions, 3-4 times a week. She has had the dark circles for quite awhile, but it seems to be getting worse and now appears to be permanent. A teacher at school actually commented on whether she was OK as she thought she looked ill and tired.  My daughter is now very conscious!  I have lost count on the number of goggles tried!  We will now investigate some of the suggestions listed above.  Any other suggestions would be gratefully appreciated.
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Avatar universal
I am 55 years old. Started taking swimming lessons a month ago as I will not be able to do any running because of a knee injury.

The panda eyes seem to be getting worse after every swimming session.

How  is the TYR Hydrovision working for you versus Barracuda Wire Mask?

Appreciate it if you could respond
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Thank you for this thread. I am 39 years old, and I've been a fitness swimmer x 2 years.  I am also an internal medicine physician.  Swimming has been the best exercise I've ever discovered, but I have significant swelling around my eyes after an hour swim.  I've come to call the swelling, affectionately, my "goggle hickies."  I wear contacts, and swimming without goggles would be inappropriate.

Just assessing the situation from a medical perspective, it seems to me that the swelling is somewhat reactive due to the pressure, but over time, I think that repeated pressure could cause some movement of facial tissue.  

I have tried a variety of goggles, including several Nike & Speedo versions.  For the past year, I've been swimming exclusively with Aquasphere Vistas for ladies.  Initially, I did not have the marks--or, at least they were not as pronounced as with the Nike/Speedos.  Over time, however, I still develop them, but not in the same places.  Still under the eyes, though.  All in all, Aquaspheres are more comfortable.

Recently, I tried a larger Aquasphere (name escapes me)--more mask-like, but not a true mask.  They leaked--probably just too big for my face.  

I am interested in this 1) vaseline idea, to reduce pressure; 2) speedo strapless goggles using adhesive, 3) TYR hydrovision, and the 4) Baracuda wire mask.  Am interested in any follow up anyone has wiht use of these products, and I will post what I discover with them as well.

    
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Avatar universal
I am so glad to have found this thread! I am 31 years old and have swam competitively my whole life and currently swim 3-4 times a week for an hour on a Masters Team. This past swummer I have really gotten into open water swimming, doing races that are 1-2 hours long and at the 2 hour swim I did last month my left eye was so sore under the eye and when I got back to my hotel I literally had a blister on my face, where my goggles had been. This "eye blister" was really painful and not very becoming. It took most of the day for the swelling to go down and I got some funny looks wandering around Chicago afterwards!! Now, I notice that my left eye is always sensitive when using my prescription goggles which are larger, and really with any of my goggles. It's an instant discomfort, but only on that side. The marks on my face also take hours to go away. I am going to try some of the goggles mentioned here and hope for the best. I thought perhaps it was allergy related, but I'm not having any other symptoms except the painful eye socket and major skin irritation. I too have people asking if I'm ok and telling that I look tired. No, instead of saying "did you sleep badly last night?" my coworkers just look at me and say, "oh she was swimming this morning." Great. I used to wear the swedish goggles as a kid and never had any problems. Getting old really is the pits!!
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Agree with you, OKYes, it's nearly impossible to swim without goggles (or a mask) if you are used to using them.  

Well my AquaSphere mask kicked the bucket after a year.  I find they do last exactly a year and then start leaking.  So I'm going to see what other masks are out there.  I am of the opinion that any goggle I use is going to exacerbate the problem of the fat pads siting on top of where my cheeks used to be.  

And yes, DailySwimmer....the getting older thing ain't easy.  I take some consolation in knowing it happens to all of us but some seem to age more gracefully than others.  I became a hardcore outdoor swimmer in my early 30's and continued until my early 40's.  All that sun and goggle wearing didn't help matters NOW but man, I looked and felt great during those years.  I always looked very young, up until about 47.  The loss of youth and good looks is something we have to just have to accept.  
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2 Comments
Hi Buni,

How long did it take for your puffy eye bags to retreat?

I’ve stopped swimming with goggles for about 1 week, and they are still there.

Thanks!
Just answered you in a longer reply below.  For me I think it took up to a year of not wearing goggles but everyone is different.  It could take a few weeks to a few months.  Try to reduce the sodium in your diet as well as any stress.  I was very stressed out around the time I started this thread and *that* does not help matters!  :-)

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