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Avatar universal

rash on both breasts, help!

I am a 44 year old caucasian healthy woman who has developed a rash on both breasts.  I do have a respiratory cough which began around the time that I noticed the rash.  This rash has been present for 2 weeks. I have breast implants from surgery a little over a year ago.   I  washed all my bras several times in hot water and sheets, and any other garments in contact with my breasts.   This condition is alleviated by not wearing a bra. I tan regularly but never expose my breasts while tanning. The only medication that I've started taking recently is Lisonopril (2 months ago). I also take Lorazapam as needed, and Tesslon Perle for the cough.   As previously stated, the rash began 2 weeks ago.  The rash gets worse when I scratch.  Any contact to the skin causes it to feel slightly itchy.  When i take a shower, the rash becomes prominant.  I am fair complected but have never had any skin problems, not even acne.  The skin on my breasts feel a bit "rough" to the touch. The rash feels elevated and appears in ablotchy pattern in a circle.  I had a visit to my internal medicine doctor who saw it at its most prominant moment, as I had been sitting there with a paper vest for cover. He prescribed TRIAMCINOLONE ACETONIDE cream.  I applied the cream as directed and also took some benadryl but I don't see any results whatsoever, even after taking all the necessary precautions (washing everything, etc).l HELP!!! This is driving me crazy and I can't go without wearing a bra! What could this be?? Thanks.
6 Responses
242489 tn?1210500813
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
The only rash I can think of that comes close to your description is eczema or one of its variants.  The breast implants have nothing to do with it.  Triamcinolone was a good choice, but it's fairly mild.  See a dermatologist, but before you go, pick up some Sarna Sensitive lotion at the drugstore (OTC), apply it every time you think of scratching, and don't scratch.  I am confident that you have nothing to worry about.

Take care.

Dr. Rockoff
172023 tn?1334675884
On a side note, watch the cough.  A persistent, annoying cough can be a side effect of ACE inhibitors such as Lisinopril.  If you've recently had a cold, it's probably just from that, but if you are just noticing a lingering, annoying cough for no apparent reason...speak to your doctor about the Lisinopril.
Avatar universal
REgarding the cough and Lisonopril.  Is it possible for the cough to start even 9 weeks after taking the medication?: I don't have a cold but i do have all the phlegm that comes with this nasty cough.  I actuallty mentioned this to my doctor but he dismissed it.  Thanks for ALL of your information, it truly helps!
172023 tn?1334675884
It's usually described as a persistent dry cough, so if yours is phlegmy, it might not be from that.  I take the same med, so it caught my eye.  I haven't ever had a cough from it, though.

Good luck!
Avatar universal
You might want to go to a breast care centre and have the rash appraised by them. Inflammatory breast cancer presents with a rash, rather than a lump. Best to be prudent and have it checked out. Lots of bc doctors haven't seen ibc as it is fairly rare. Best be safe than sorry. I have bc and am treated at a specialist bc centre, so they know what they are looking at.
Take care, good luck.
Avatar universal
Were you successful in treating this problem?  I have had the exact same symptons for one week. Like yourself I have never had any skin problems.  
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