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sebaceous cysts

Hi,

i have what i think are sebaceous cysts on my scrotum but from what i've read they are supposed to be soft. Mine are hard and they are unsqueezable. When i try to squeese any of them its extremely painful. Any suggestions??
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563773 tn?1374246539
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Sebaceous cyst is a closed sac or cyst below the surface of the skin and fills with a fatty white, semi-solid material called sebum produced by sebaceous glands of the epidermis.It is usually painless but can become painful if infected.Then antibiotics are needed. Sometimes they may need cautery or surgical excision from a surgeon also.

From your symptoms,as the lump is painful and hard so it can be either an infected sebaceous cyst or a boil. A boil generally starts as a reddened, tender area. Over time, the area becomes firm and hard. Eventually, the center of the abscess softens and becomes filled with pus.

Apply warm compresses on the boil and keep the area clean.Drainage of the boil is done only when it becomes soft and forms a head.Take some over the counter pain reliever and consult a doctor for examination and antibiotics prescription.

I hope that helps. Please do keep me posted if you have any additional queries. Kind regards.


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Avatar universal
Hi,

In most individuals there are outbreaks of folliculitis from time to time.

Folliculitis is infection and inflammation of the hair follicles. The condition may be superficial (i.e., on the surface of the skin) or deep within the follicles.The most common cause of folliculitis is infection by the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus.

Folliculitis symptoms can appear independent of infection. Exposure of the skin to certain chemicals, especially oils and tars, can trigger an outbreak. People with depressed immune systems, diabetes, or obesity have a greater risk of contracting folliculitis than the general population.

Patients with chronic unresponsive folliculitis may require investigation into the source of the infection. S. aureus bacteria can live in the patient's nostrils, periodically triggering a folliculitis outbreak.

Individuals who are predisposed to folliculitis should be extremely careful about personal hygiene. Application of antiseptic washes may help prevent recurrences. A topical antibiotic cream, mupirocin (Bactroban®), has been effective at reducing bacterial colonization in the nostrils. It is applied twice daily for a week and is repeated every 6 months.

If there any of the mentioned medical causes then treating those will reduce the occurence of the condition.
http://www.dermatologychannel.net/follicle/folliculitis.shtml

Some stubborn cases of folliculitis have been responsive to laser-assisted hair removal. This process uses a laser to destroy the follicle. This reduces the scarring that results from folliculitis.

Let us know if you need any other information and consult a skin specialist if the lesion is persistent.

Regards.
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