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Diabetes - Type 1 Community
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Avatar universal

Night time lows

Hi,
Love this site, thank you so much for taking the time to answer questions and make us all more knowledgeable!
I'm a wife of a diabetic. He's under very good control and has been type 1 for 21 years. Every so often, he has that night time low, very early morning usually, where he starts having a seizure or convulsion. My question is about treating it.
Does anyone have an opinion about knowing weather if gone untreated by me, will he come out of it on his own? Sometimes, I'll treat him and I hardly get any gel or frosting in him and it will stop. I guess I don't know if I'm even doing anything to be helpful. Maybe, I should just let it go and treat him afterwards with juice, when he's awake?
We haven't had one in awhile, I've probably just jinxed him!! Anyway, just looking for others experiences and opinions.
(I may have written about this before, but I couldn't remember what the answers were...! Sorry)

mlz
3 Responses
Avatar universal
I am not a doctor and can't give you any qualified medical advice.  I am a Type I diabetic and my vote would be to treat as soon as you become aware of low blood sugar symptoms. Obviously, if he is awake, I would test his blood sugar while giving him juice or glucose tablets or gel.  You may want to talk to his physician about other options for treatment when he is having a seizure.  There are glucagon injections that are helpful when someone is unconscious or can't swallow. I would never just let it go and wait for him to come out of it.

Of course, the best option is to look at ways to prevent the lows.  Although this is not always easy, your doctor may be able to advise some changes in his insulin or blood testing routine that may help prevent these severe lows.  Diabetes is a lot of work and it sounds like you are a very supportive wife. Good luck to both of you.
Es
Avatar universal
Another volunteer here ... echo ES's comments and also have this to add.

One of the most important things to do *while* a person is having a seizure is to protect them from hurting themselves with all their flailing around.

As you pull away small furniture or objects that he could hurt himself on, it's a good idea to call 911 so you'll have strong back up to help.  

ES is right -- it's best to avoid these lows, but we can't count on being 100% successful at that.  He's lucky to have you in his corner.
Avatar universal
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