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Diabetes - Type 2 Community
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Avatar universal

Vinegar

I just found out some exciting information and have  been using it with success for a few days!  Vinegar, google vinegar and blood sugars.  Two tablespoons before meals has great lowering effects on blood glucose spikes after meals.  Just wanted to share!
15 Responses
649848 tn?1534633700
Per a previous thread we had - I was in a health food store today and did see some vinegar pills - I wonder if they work the same as regular vinegar - it's hard to carry around a bottle of vinegar all the time.  What do you think?  
Avatar universal
Hi there,yeah, I was going to tell you, I was in GNC the other day and I saw the pills also.  They also had a really expensive bottle of regular  "organic" vinegar that didn't sound any different then the kind in the grocery store.   I wondered the same thing about the efficiency of the pills  as compared to the real vinegar.  I tried to do an internet search about them but couldn't find any real info.  A lot of  people seem under the belief that the real stuff is better, but people are saying they get good results with the pills also.  My NP told me to try cinnamin  pills also.  I have been taking them but don't know how good they are. The problem is that I forget to take them regularly.  We went out to dinner tonight and I took a small bottle that used to contain cough syrup that I cleaned out really well, filled with two tablespoons of vinegar with me.  I was in Red Lobster and looking around to see if anyone was watching me, then I was going to try to swig it down out of the bottle real fast.  I finally decided that there were too many people around, so me and my daughter went into the ladies room which was also crowded.  I ended up in a stall swigging down the vinegar out of a cough syrup bottle.  I hope you are having some good imagery here lol.    Shannon
683115 tn?1226708464
I have tried the Apple Cider Vinegar and it didn't work for me.  The difference in the vinegars is quite a bit.  The ones that they recommend for health (and we use it for other things) is the one with the "mother" in it which is the "organic" one I would think.  It usually has some orange coloured "sediment" in it.  I have not seen the pills here (Australia) but they might be available.
141598 tn?1355671763
Ditto Hathani about the vinegar differences. Which one did you use rootietootie? Apple, White, Balsamic, Malt, Rice, Rice, Wine, etc? I would like to try but know that balsamic and rice vinegar raises my glucose and don't feel up to experimenting.
Thanks.
649848 tn?1534633700
I was looking at the Mayo Clinic web site last night and ran across some studies they have done.  According to them, there's no evidence that vinegar will do anything to help boost metabolism, but can help with other things.  

I've always read that the vinegar to use is the apple cider vinegar.  
Avatar universal
The one I use is apple cider vinegar, the one in the grocery store is the same as the expensive ones in the vitamin stores.  It has the sediment, its just not called "organic."  From what I read it works better on people who are not diabetics yet but are insulin intolerant, or pre-diabetic.  I am having amazing results on this, my sugars are not going above 140 even after high carbo meals.  I am also looking into supplements that can raise blood sugars and something I didn't know was that the fish oil and omega supplements can significantly raise blood sugars.  There is something about the fat (even if it is good fat) that carries glucose and can make you spike late.  It is the same like a high fat meal would do to sugars.  I really never thought about that before, but I know a lot of people take those supplements.  I think the vinegar must have the opposite effect that the fat has.  There is so much that doctors and other organizations don't know.  
141598 tn?1355671763
"..something I didn't know was that the fish oil and omega supplements can significantly raise blood sugars."

This statement raised [no pun] my curiosity level. Do you have a web page or link to substantiate this claim? It has been my understanding that Omega 3 helps lower glucose in Type II's. I've been taking 1000 mg of wild salmon oil daily for ten years and find that it does help stabilize "my" glucose levels, not raise it. If diabetics are at risk for heart attacks and Omega 3 is recommended by the ADA as part of the diet to reduce heart attacks, according to your statement it appears we have a contradiction. To quote the ADA "At the same time, you can protect your heart by eating the healthy fats – monounsaturated, polyunsaturated and omega-3 fats." So my question is, is Omega 3 bad for "some" Type II diabetics?
Avatar universal
Hi there,  I take a lot of supplements so I went over them with my NP to see what she thought about if any of them would affect BS.  I take an omega 3 very irregularly.  She said fat affects BS a lot, and can cause false low readings after eating, and then they spike later, which isn't good for diabetics who are trying to control this.  The fish oils and omegas even though are good fats still have the same "fat" affect on the glucose.  I found several articles on it, and am still looking for the really good one I found the other day, here is one for now http://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/blog/Amy_Campbell/Fat_Facts_Part_2
141598 tn?1355671763
Thanks for responding. I read the web page and Amy Campbell discusses saturated trans fat which we can all agree is horribly bad. Trans fat and saturated fat affects glucose levels. When sugar is digested it goes two places; First to red cells to be used as energy, and second to fat to be used later for energy. An O-3 fat cell is a fatty acid that burns off glucose if they attach to it. This is where I don't see the connection between trans/sat fat and O-3 fatty acid. With type 2's the excess glucose binds to red cells and circulate thru the body for approx 3 months until that cell dies off. O-3 cells get used up rather quickly and helps the body lower glucose levels.

The only time she mentions an O-3 fat is in her response, "The point of my previous two blogs on fat was not to imply that all fat is bad. Olive oil, canola oil, and fish oils are examples of heart-healthy fats." So here is where she claims not all fat is the same, and as I believe O-3 is good from fish and certain oils.
Avatar universal
Hey, yeah, I don't think they are bad, just might mess with blood sugar a little.  I found another article that said it is large does of Omegas that raise blood sugars, maybe that is what she meant.  Its so confusing now a days with so many supplements out there.  I guess we just have to see what works for us too and take everything with a grain of salt.
Avatar universal
Okay, I found another one http://www.vitaminstuff.com/supplements-omega-3.html  I think it is only if you take large amounts.  
141598 tn?1355671763
Ditto, watch the dose. Makes me wonder who would consume 3 grams (3000 milligrams) of fish oil unless they're constipated.
Avatar universal
I believe it is the pectin in apples that is in apple cider vinegar that is of benefit for weight loss, blood pressure and I have heard that you drink 2 tbs before each meal.  Sounds good to me.  Am going to try it.  I used to like to drink vinegar with a little hot sauce, soy sauce and a touch of salt.  Maybe we should just drink 2 tbs of lite italian dressings.    Just a joke.  But might help it go down better.  Also pickle juice is  good for appetite suppressant.  Anybody else heard of the pickle juice theory?.
649848 tn?1534633700
Haven't heard of pickle juice for appetite control, but have heard of it being used to control stomach acid/acid reflux.  

You might be right about the pectin in apples - I eat a lot of apples and it helps control my appetite (an apple about an hour before a meal helps fill you up so you eat less), they make me feel full for a long time and there's plenty of fiber to keep everything else moving smoothly (especially if eaten with the peeling).  

Let me know how the vinegar works out for you.
649848 tn?1534633700
Haven't heard of pickle juice for appetite control, but have heard of it being used to control stomach acid/acid reflux.  

You might be right about the pectin in apples - I eat a lot of apples and it helps control my appetite (an apple about an hour before a meal helps fill you up so you eat less), they make me feel full for a long time and there's plenty of fiber to keep everything else moving smoothly (especially if eaten with the peeling).  

Let me know how the vinegar works out for you.
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