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Karen Nottingham

I am a type 2 diabetic and normally my morning fasting glucose numbers are between mid 70 to mid 80;except when I exercice.  I recently changed my excercise program to daily morning walks of around 2 1/2 miles for cardio and evening routines of 30 minutes of toning and strength resisitences.  For the past couple of weeks, my fasting number in morning after my cardio routine has been running between 90 to 100.  Is this normal or should I be concerned?  FYI my diabetes is considered managed and for the past three years my AiC number has been 5.4 and 5.3.

Kasey004
7 Responses
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141598 tn?1355671763
I don't see levels descending. What I've seen over the past dozen years is postprandial has elevated from<141 mg/dl to <180 mg/dl. Recommended fasting levels have remained relatively the same, A1c slightly elevated [few tenths], and OGTT have remained the same.

Speaking of A1c levels, an A1c of <5.1% is not absurd considering it equates to an eAG of 100 mg/dl. Further, an A1c of 6% is right at the prediabetes max of 125 mg/dl. IMO, the latter is unhealthy.

Also, prediabetes does not initiate Rx'ing medication, higher diabetic levels do. I base this on the doctors I have spoken with who do not Rx to a prediabetes patient due to possible/potential hypoglycemia.

Good to see changing exercise time helped balance your levels.
Helpful - 0
Cat
osakaroseExternal User
I had the same problem when I was exercising in the evenings. I like to run on the treadmill about 2-3 hours before bedtime. I did not factor in that my liver was probably producing glycogen in order to fuel my workouts. This was resulting in a high reading for me in the mornings even when I had very few carbs to eat the night before. WaveRider pointed this out to me when I questioned my fluctuations in readings. I changed my exercise time to the mornings and afternoons and now my fasting glucose in the morning is right where it should be for me. Keep up the exercise! Just change the time you do it. You're doing great!
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Cat
osakaroseExternal User
The ADA and the AACE always differ in their interpretation of what is a normal level for the fasting blood glucose. It is constantly being revised downwards and I think that it is getting ridiculously low! The level of 6 as an A1C used to be considered normal and OK. Then it went to <6 and now there is talk of making it <5. Absurd!  The only reason it keeps getting revised downwards is because Big Pharma wants to put more and more people into the category of "pre-diabetes" so that they can push their pills onto them. Now, most of the posters here do have a huge problem with their glucose levels and they are Type 2's. But look how many new posters have low blood sugar and yet are being told that they are "pre-diabetic" and being put on meds. I believe in treating chronic disease only if a person truly needs it. And I do not trust the medical community to not be bribed into pushing pills. I have seen it happen too many times.
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141598 tn?1355671763
As you probably know the A1c provides a 2-3 month average of glucose levels. The ADA has an online formula which converts A1c to eAG [estimated daily Average Glucose]. The latter takes the A1c average and converts it to a daily basis. With this in mind, your home test meter still provides the best insight on preprandial and postprandial levels. The ADA eAG web page is  http://tinyurl.com/eAG-calculator

Once on the ADA page you will see a chart on the right. You will notice that an A1c of 6% equals 126 mg/dl, the start of diabetes.  It doesn't make sense to say 6% is OK and then turn around and say 126 mg/dl is not OK. Then why does the ADA say 6% is OK when AACE [American Association of Clinical Endocrinologist] state in their guidelines an A1c of <5.4% as normal? Reference: AACE Diabetes Care Plan Guidelines, Endocr Pract. 2011;17(Suppl 2) 7. As far as I know the ADA obtyains their info from AACE. Is the ADA behind in its updates?

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Avatar universal
According to my doctor and the American Diabetic Association ideal A1C levels should be below 6.  My doctor seems pretty happy with my numbers.  Is there another A1C guideline I should be following?
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2094297 tn?1345389093
  I agree I noticed that in the morning and after exercise glucose levels were elevated, but from what you are saying, you have this well in hand, I would just keep doing what you are doing, I could never get my levels as good as yours.
Helpful - 0
141598 tn?1355671763
Never test glucose directly after exercising. This is due to your body still releasing adrenalin and glycogen for needed energy. Doing so gets you false/positive results. Test time may vary with individuals. I find that 40-60 minutes of post exercise rest is my best time to test.

Your A1c is a tad into prediabetes land where 5.3% and 5.4% equates to a daily glucose level of 105 mg/dl and 108 mg/dl. Try lowering your carb intake to help reduce your blood sugar levels. And BIG KUDOS for your exercise regimen. Good luck -
Helpful - 0

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