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Stomach spasms 5 yr old Maltese Abby

2 days ago My precious Abby started shaking terribly and arching her body, I straight away picked her up, and held her tight and walking about with her, then sat with her rubbing her patting her, and she eventually calmed and relaxed,this happened late in the afternoon, when I gave her food she was not interested. in the morning I offered her
some chicken pieces & pellets which she ate, about half an hour later she was vomiting all over, I tried giving her more later in the afternoon, but it appeared to couldn't keep anything down. During the night she had another spasm, again today.I took her to the vet yesterday, who took her temperature which was normal, she has had problems with her stomach on previous occasions but has been pretty well I'd say for the last3 months. The vet gave her an injection of Dexa 2ml,Ketofen 10%, and tabs Rimadyl for pain & Cimlock Antibiotic. I had been giving her pellets mixed with Husky chicken chunks in Jelly mixed, vet said to rather give only bland steamed chicken & rice which I have been doing since yesterday, she has not vomited again but got the shakes again this afternoon.
I cannot understand what is causing these spasms. I would appreciated any advise. Beryl Arthur


2 Responses
675347 tn?1365464245
COMMUNITY LEADER
I'm wondering if her symptoms could be caused by an attack of Pancreatitis...? Inflammation of the Pancreas is very painful (i.e. her shaking) and most often causes vomiting.
It is confirmed by blood tests showing elevated amylase and/or lipase levels, along with a new serum test called canine pancreatitis lipase immuninol reactivity and TAP (Trypsinogen Activation Peptide).

The cause can sometimes be unknown, but very often follows after eating any fatty food (Turkey skin for instance, or even chicken fat etc) Even a few table scraps CAN cause Pancreatitis attacks in susceptible dogs. And very often, when they have had one -unless they stay on a strict diet, they can get another attack in the future.

Has your vet excluded this as a possibility?

The treatment sounds harsh but is the best way to manage an attack. Usually the dog is completely fasted for a few days. As this sometimes means no water either, it is best done under hospital conditions, so the dog an be given fluids and electrolytes by IV. This gives the Pancreas chance to heal.  
441382 tn?1452814169
I agree 100% with Ginger, it sounds like an attack of pancreatitis to me.  The normal treatment for pancreatitis is one week of hospitalization on NOTHING but IV fluids, not even water to drink, to give the pancreas TOTAL REST.  After the week is up, they start slowly introducing very bland food.                                          

Any time a dog is fed human food there is the risk of them developing pancreatitis, and even one meal can be enough to cause it.  Keep in mind that human food is much higher in fat than foods designed for dogs, and dogs cannot process those fats.  Pancreatitis is EXTREMELY painful, and if that is what is causing her problems, that's why she is shaking.

I would either take her back to the vet and ask him to test her for it or find another vet and get a second opinion.  Pancreatitis can be life-threatening so it's important to have it checked out quickly.

Ghilly
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675347 tn?1365464245
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