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pyo alternate treatment??

Our little Yorkie was acting lethargic 10 weeks post partum..  We had Pyometra in one of our other dogs a few years ago and the uteris had to be removed, but the pyo was not discovered until after severe infection.  This has not even shown up on xray (just a little gray) and the blood tests returned negative.  Bee (because her little tail never stops) is now acting normal after 2 days clavomox.  But the pyro could absolutely be festering.  THE QUESTION IS: is there an alternate treatment to surgery, in the event she is positive, since this is in early stage??
   Thank you, Marshall
Type of Animal :   dog Age of Animal :   4 Sex of Animal :   Female Breed of Animal :   yorkshire terrier (teacup) Last date your pet was examined by a vet? :   April 25, 2009
7 Responses
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675347 tn?1365460645
COMMUNITY LEADER
Yeah, pyometra is so nasty, and if it isn't acute, with really dramatic symptoms, (at which stage it can already be too late) it's easy to think it is possible to 'work around it'. But I always think it's better to be safe than sorry. Basically, pyometra kills dogs.

Of course, b**ches like having pups. It is a pretty natural thing to do after all! We've all been doing it for a long time now! But it does 'take it out' of them, and is very draining, especially if they are bred repeatedly (which is just dreadful!) I think it takes years off their lives. In the wild, living as Nature intended, an 8 year-old (wolf or dog) is quite old! Some make it to 12-13, but not as many as domestic dogs.
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441382 tn?1452810569
I completely agree with all three of you.  I gave the response that I did about the prostaglandin therapy because even though spaying is the best route to take in the face of pyometra, the OP came here asking if there were any alternative treatments, so I was giving them information that I knew to be true.  Due to the harshness of the treatment itself I try to dissuade people from choosing to take that route, but if they ask if an alternative treatment exists, I've got to be honest and say so.

For what it's worth, in my opinion, the only time prostaglandin treatment should be chosen in lieu of a spay is if it's a truly superlative b*tch who is the last of her bloodline.  But then, I am of the opinion that the only dogs that should be bred in the first place are those who have finished their championships, who have proven that they meet the standard for their breed.  Other than that, there is no need to breed just to make pets.  There will never be a shortage of pets because it's not likely that everyone will spay or neuter their own animals, so there will be enough "oops" litters and shelter dogs to provide people with pets for the rest of our lifetimes.  Deliberately breeding mixed breeds and giving them kitschy names and calling them "Designer Breeds" is probably my pet peeve in this world.  OK.  Let me get off my soapbox now.  LOL

Ghilly
Helpful - 0
172023 tn?1334672284
Me, too.  We are not serving the best interests of any particular b*tch when we breed.  By far, we are answering some need of our own.

The best answer is to spay.  I'm sorry, I know its not what you want to hear.  
Helpful - 0
765775 tn?1366024691
I agree with Ginger.
Helpful - 0
675347 tn?1365460645
COMMUNITY LEADER
I hate to come down hard on this, because you probably have strong reasons for keeping her 'entire', or are afraid of the surgery for her...(?)

But my instinct would be to have her uterus removed (ie have her spayed) if she is fit and strong enough for surgery, and has no other health problems which might make surgery dangerous.  I think in the long run she will be much healthier for it, and you will not have the constant concern over her wellbeing. I don't think pyometra or 'borderline pyometra' is anything to take a soft line with.

And I am usually all for alternative treatments, whenever possible.
Helpful - 0
475300 tn?1312423126
I have also heard of an antibiotic duche (sp?)  Good Luck
Helpful - 0
441382 tn?1452810569
There is a treatment for pyometra that can be done with injection of prostaglandins.  There are a few problems with this type of treatment.  It can be quite uncomfortable, and usually, unless the dog is bred back on her next heat cycle, the pyometra returns.  It is usually reserved only for treatment of dogs where it is extremely important to someone to preserve a bloodline, since it is not a guaranteed treatment (life-saving spaying may still be necessary) and it is so uncomfortable for the dog to go through it.

Discuss everything with your vet and from there you can go with his or suggestions to decide which route is best for you and your dog to take.  Please let us know how things go.  Bee sounds like a little sweetie!

Ghilly
Helpful - 0
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