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Abnormal hiccups

Hello, I am 25 and have had very strange hiccups my entire life. It sounds like i am being choked for a quick second and it does hurt a little bit. I recently discovered that i was born around 2 months premature with underdeveloped lungs. Could there be something structurally wrong with my trachea? Or is this (somewhat) normal?
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Avatar universal
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Hello,
The exact cause of your symptoms can be determined only after I examine you. Hiccups are caused by spasm of the diapahragm.Eating quickly, eating too hot or cold foods, swallowing air all can lead to irritation of the phrenic nerve and hiccups. Any abscess below the diaphragm, inflammation of the pancreas, hiatus hernia may cause belching or hiccups shortly after eating a meal. You may take 1 teaspoon lemon juice with 1/2 teaspoon baking soda in 1 cup cool water. Drink it quickly after meals. Ginger tea can help. Pour 1 cup boiling water over 1 teaspoon freshly grated gingerroot. Steep for 5 minutes, then drink. Another remedy is mixing 1 teaspoon fresh ginger pulp with 1 teaspoon lime juice, and swallow after a meal. Eat slowly and chew food completely before swallowing. Keep your mouth closed while you chew. In case these do not offer any relief over-the-counter antacid containing simethicone may be helpful. This medicine breaks larger bubbles into smaller ones and decreases beltching.If the symptoms are severe consult a doctor. I hope it helps.
Best luck and regards!
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