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Singing voice gone for months

Hello,
I used to sing very comfortably from birth however at 4th of April 2014 I had a hernia surgery. Before surgery I was very nervous that the intubation process could damage my voice. After the surgery I was still very nervous got kind of depression and stuff. Later I went to an ENT to get my vocal cords checked. He said there is nothing wrong with them but I got silent reflux probably due to the stress. I was able to sing a bit until then but now all my singing ability is lost. My throat feels different and I feel there is always a lot of mucus down there. My voice feels different too, I feel like I never sung in my life before. I also use two medicines for depression that my doc gave me and I used a medicine for reflux. Currently I do not use a medicine for reflux but thinking of going to an ENT again. So why did my voice become like that? What is the matter? I am going crazy because there is nothing certain. Doctors say my vocal cords are fine but why cant I sing like before? Please someone give me an advice. I need help
1 Responses
209987 tn?1451935465
You mentioned an acid problem. It could very well be the cause.
You also mentioned that it feels like mucus in throat...could be post-nasal drip.
You metioned anxiety/depression...can also be from this.
You were so worried about your vocal cords, that it's possible you now have a mental block of sorts.

I would ask to see an ENT. They will be able to get to the bottom of it.
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