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Avatar universal

Epilepsy or Sleep Paralysis?

Hello, i am a 14 year old female, and a few months ago I experienced something close to a seizure, but I am not sure exactly what it was. Here are some details:

-I was completely aware of what was happening
-I am almost 100% sure I was shaking, but it could be me trying to move and my body refusing
-My ears were ringing very loudly
- It happened at about 4am
-It lasted about 30 seconds maybe a minute
-When I snapped out of it, there was drool on my cheek
-I had just come back from a trip to a time zone 7 hours behind
-I have had a few nights when I feel it coming, but I move to make it go away
-It had never happened before and hasn't happened again.

Any help is appreciated. Thanks!
1 Responses
Avatar universal
Well there are many types of seizures, some people don't actually convulse, like the ones you see in movies and on tv! I'm no doctor but believe you are fine, we've all had those times where we are almost asleep but fully aware and snap ourselfs (and sometimes our significant others lol) awake. Ringing in ears is a common thing, before I have my seizures it feels like I have a "wooshy" feeLing in my ears, almost like loyd bass from as car. Have you had any aura changes, or any severe/chronic deja vu, these are often in relation to seizures, bit can also just be a common occurrence!
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