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Got any strategies for heat induced vomiting during fast run?

My question is in relation to distance running like 5 k's and beyond.  My son is on the cusp of moving into another running speed group but is plagued with nausea during competitions.  It hits toward the end and results in not just nausea but occasional vomiting.  It really slows him down. I know that simply going at an accelerated pace can cause this but he does train at the higher speeds.  And this is worse when it is hot out which it has been.  We're trying to problem solve.  Ideas?
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Avatar universal
Mom, I had this problem when I was young.  I was never a formal athlete like your son, but when I was young we had to do physical fitness tests periodically.  I played sports for fun a lot, but again, I wasn't a serious athlete -- no real talent.  But I could run all day and play sports all day without any problem despite living in a place that was really hot, dry, and severely polluted.  But when we had to run the 600, and that's a short race, I always got sick to my stomach afterwards.  As I got older and started running for exercise, I ran a lot farther with no problems.  I realized the problem, for me, was psychological, not physiological.  I got nervous about it because our gym teachers talked about how hard it was.  Your son might have some physiological problem, who knows, but if he doesn't have this problem in training and only in competition, it could be nerves.  A lot of the highest level athletes have this problem, though they usually get nauseous before competing, not during or after.  Just a thought.
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Well,  I've shared that my son is indeed quite anxious and pretty much always nervous.  And self conscious.  And low self esteem. Sigh.   He is definitely anxious before these races and puts way too much pressure on himself and acts like the world rests on his finishing time.  His world at that moment does.  I don't say any of the right things to help with that.  The joys of raising a teen and the parent child dynamics.  This does seem to be odd though that it is DURING the race in the last say mile or 800 of the race.   He's going to try a double dose of antacids at his next race and we got these gin gin chews.  But it is going to be super hot that day according to the weather radar.  And I do know heat induced nausea in distance runners is a common thing.  So, wanted to problem solve that aspect.  We will start with a PHD psychologist in November with hopes of something being offered to cope with anxiety.  I'm on the verge of saying okay to medication if it is suggested which is not something I wanted to do.  But daily, he is struggling with the anxiety.  :.(((
Mom, I'd skip the antacids.  For one thing, this doesn't really sound like an acid indigestion problem.  For another, they alter the acid balance of the stomach, which can affect absorption of protein, which he needs.  It might, though this is less likely, also block absorption of minerals, which would include the electrolytes, which he also absolutely needs.  Ginger is a good idea -- the most potent way to use it is to take fresh ginger and mince it or juice it, it's stronger that way.  The candy isn't all that potent.  Tea is also more potent, but not the best tasting thing I've ever had.  You know, it could be he's just outrunning his body's fitness level or nutrient level.  Kind of like beginner marathon runners, but when you run as fast as you can you can outrun your body.  I'm assuming he runs harder and faster and puts more stress on his body in competition than when training.  But the difference in pressure between actual competition where it counts and training where it doesn't is the difference between just doing what's fun and doing it seriously, and given he doesn't have any nutritional problems or other problems when he's training, it still looks to me like he's doing something that's pushing his body when he competes in a way he doesn't when he trains.  I'm also wondering, does he eat differently before training than before racing?  Is he good enough to have a trainer who might be helping in this way?  How's his magnesium and potassium intake?  Does he maybe drink too much before racing, does he eat too fast, both of which nervous people do?
Avatar universal
Mom, I had this problem when I was young.  I was never a formal athlete like your son, but when I was young we had to do physical fitness tests periodically.  I played sports for fun a lot, but again, I wasn't a serious athlete -- no real talent.  But I could run all day and play sports all day without any problem despite living in a place that was really hot, dry, and severely polluted.  But when we had to run the 600, and that's a short race, I always got sick to my stomach afterwards.  As I got older and started running for exercise, I ran a lot farther with no problems.  I realized the problem, for me, was psychological, not physiological.  I got nervous about it because our gym teachers talked about how hard it was.  Your son might have some physiological problem, who knows, but if he doesn't have this problem in training and only in competition, it could be nerves.  A lot of the highest level athletes have this problem, though they usually get nauseous before competing, not during or after.  Just a thought.
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