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Black eye, blowing nose, eyelid inflation

i have a slight black eye, but when i blew my nose (actually i popped my ears) by bottom eyelid basically inflated, i read that you aren't supposed to blow your nose or anything afterwards, but i did it, and i am not sure what to do...i don't think its serious enough to go to a doctor, but i sure need some help.i understand that the reason this happens is because the pressure from your sinus more or less blows up your eyelid....any suggestions?
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233488 tn?1310693103
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
That problem is call orbital/eyelid emphysema. If you have trauma it may well mean that you have a small fracture in one of the thin bones that surround the maxillary sinus or a tear in the tear duct.

In any case you need to see an Eye MD and in the meantime do not blow your nose unless you have to and if you have to blow easy and do not occlude one nostril.

JCH MD
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Avatar universal
I know this happens to me from time to time.  When you were a kid, did you ever hold your nose and mouth shut and blow real hard into you sinus?  We'd do that sometimes to relieve pressure going up and down large hills and around mountains on family trips.  Well, from time to time instead of popping my ears I'd feel something like a bubble run under one of my eyes like the air escaped through the eye socket.  Sounds just like what you had happen.  It always startled me.

I'm not trying to counter the wisdom of Dr Hagan, just saying it seems possible for that to happen without any real problems if you really get the pressure going in your sinus.
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233488 tn?1310693103
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
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